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Change in prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami population in rural Northern Norway using a repeated cross-sectional population-based study design: the SAMINOR Study.
BMJ Open. 2019 06 14; 9(6):e027791.BO

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the change in both the prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Sami and non-Sami in Northern Norway due to a lack of knowledge regarding the development of MetS in this population.

DESIGN

Repeated cross-sectional study.

SETTING

The study is based on data from the SAMINOR 1 Survey (2003-2004, n=6550) and the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014, n=6004), conducted in 10 municipalities in Northern Norway.

PARTICIPANTS

Men and women aged 40-79 years were invited. We excluded participants not handing in the questionnaire and with missing information concerning ethnicity questions or MetS risk factors resulting in a final sample of 6308 (36.0% Sami) subjects in SAMINOR 1 and 5866 (40.9% Sami) subjects in SAMINOR 2.

OUTCOME MEASURES

MetS prevalence was determined using the harmonised Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) criteria, and severity was assessed with the MetS severity Z-score. Generalised estimating equations with an interaction term (survey × ethnicity) were used to compare prevalence and severity between the two surveys while accounting for partly repeated measurements.

RESULTS

The overall, age-standardised ATP-III-MetS prevalence was 31.2% (95% CI: 29.8 to 32.6) in SAMINOR 1 and 35.6% (95% CI: 34.0 to 37.3) in SAMINOR 2. Both the ATP-III-MetS prevalence and the mean MetS severity Z-score increased between the surveys in all subgroups, except the ATP-III-MetS prevalence in non-Sami women, which remained stable. Over time, Sami men showed a slightly larger increase in MetS severity than non-Sami men (p<0.001): the score increased by 0.20 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.25) and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10) in Sami and non-Sami men, respectively. Abdominal obesity increased markedly between the surveys in all subgroups.

CONCLUSION

The prevalence and severity of MetS increased over time in rural Northern Norway. Abdominal obesity appeared to drive the increase in ATP-III-MetS prevalence. Sami men had a slightly larger increase in severity than non-Sami.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Health, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Community Health, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Public Health and Nursing, HUNT Research Centre, NTNU - Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Department of Clinical Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Community Health, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Community Health, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.Department of Community Health, Centre for Sami Health Research, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31201190

Citation

Michalsen, Vilde L., et al. "Change in Prevalence and Severity of Metabolic Syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami Population in Rural Northern Norway Using a Repeated Cross-sectional Population-based Study Design: the SAMINOR Study." BMJ Open, vol. 9, no. 6, 2019, pp. e027791.
Michalsen VL, Kvaløy K, Svartberg J, et al. Change in prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami population in rural Northern Norway using a repeated cross-sectional population-based study design: the SAMINOR Study. BMJ Open. 2019;9(6):e027791.
Michalsen, V. L., Kvaløy, K., Svartberg, J., Siri, S. R. A., Melhus, M., & Broderstad, A. R. (2019). Change in prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami population in rural Northern Norway using a repeated cross-sectional population-based study design: the SAMINOR Study. BMJ Open, 9(6), e027791. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-027791
Michalsen VL, et al. Change in Prevalence and Severity of Metabolic Syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami Population in Rural Northern Norway Using a Repeated Cross-sectional Population-based Study Design: the SAMINOR Study. BMJ Open. 2019 06 14;9(6):e027791. PubMed PMID: 31201190.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Change in prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome in the Sami and non-Sami population in rural Northern Norway using a repeated cross-sectional population-based study design: the SAMINOR Study. AU - Michalsen,Vilde L, AU - Kvaløy,Kirsti, AU - Svartberg,Johan, AU - Siri,Susanna R A, AU - Melhus,Marita, AU - Broderstad,Ann R, Y1 - 2019/06/14/ PY - 2019/6/16/entrez PY - 2019/6/16/pubmed PY - 2020/6/9/medline KW - preventive medicine KW - public health SP - e027791 EP - e027791 JF - BMJ open JO - BMJ Open VL - 9 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the change in both the prevalence and severity of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the Sami and non-Sami in Northern Norway due to a lack of knowledge regarding the development of MetS in this population. DESIGN: Repeated cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study is based on data from the SAMINOR 1 Survey (2003-2004, n=6550) and the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014, n=6004), conducted in 10 municipalities in Northern Norway. PARTICIPANTS: Men and women aged 40-79 years were invited. We excluded participants not handing in the questionnaire and with missing information concerning ethnicity questions or MetS risk factors resulting in a final sample of 6308 (36.0% Sami) subjects in SAMINOR 1 and 5866 (40.9% Sami) subjects in SAMINOR 2. OUTCOME MEASURES: MetS prevalence was determined using the harmonised Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III) criteria, and severity was assessed with the MetS severity Z-score. Generalised estimating equations with an interaction term (survey × ethnicity) were used to compare prevalence and severity between the two surveys while accounting for partly repeated measurements. RESULTS: The overall, age-standardised ATP-III-MetS prevalence was 31.2% (95% CI: 29.8 to 32.6) in SAMINOR 1 and 35.6% (95% CI: 34.0 to 37.3) in SAMINOR 2. Both the ATP-III-MetS prevalence and the mean MetS severity Z-score increased between the surveys in all subgroups, except the ATP-III-MetS prevalence in non-Sami women, which remained stable. Over time, Sami men showed a slightly larger increase in MetS severity than non-Sami men (p<0.001): the score increased by 0.20 (95% CI: 0.14 to 0.25) and 0.06 (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.10) in Sami and non-Sami men, respectively. Abdominal obesity increased markedly between the surveys in all subgroups. CONCLUSION: The prevalence and severity of MetS increased over time in rural Northern Norway. Abdominal obesity appeared to drive the increase in ATP-III-MetS prevalence. Sami men had a slightly larger increase in severity than non-Sami. SN - 2044-6055 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31201190/Change_in_prevalence_and_severity_of_metabolic_syndrome_in_the_Sami_and_non_Sami_population_in_rural_Northern_Norway_using_a_repeated_cross_sectional_population_based_study_design:_the_SAMINOR_Study_ L2 - https://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=31201190 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -