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Gut microbiota partially mediates the effects of fine particulate matter on type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a population-based epidemiological study.
Environ Int. 2019 09; 130:104882.EI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Experimental studies have indicated that alterations in the gut microbiota might play a role in the pathway of diabetes induction resulting from particulate matter pollution with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 μm (PM2.5). However, few human studies have examined such experimental findings. Here, we examine the mediating effects of gut microbial dysbiosis on the associations between PM2.5 and particulate matter pollution with aerodynamic diameters < 1 μm (PM1) on diabetes using the Guangdong Gut Microbiome Project (GGMP) dataset.

METHODS

A multistage cluster sampling method was employed to recruit adult participants from communities in Guangdong. Each participant was interviewed using a questionnaire, fasting blood and stool samples were collected, and the exposure to air pollutants was assessed using a spatiotemporal land-use regression model. The mediation analysis was conducted to estimate the associations among air pollutants, gut microbiota diversity and diabetes.

RESULTS

Both PM2.5 and PM1 were positively associated with the risks of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes and negatively associated with alpha diversity indices of the gut microbiota. The mediation analyses indicated that the associations of PM2.5 and PM1 with the risk of type 2 diabetes were partially mediated by the decrease in gut microbiota diversity. Moreover, we found that 79 (PM2.5 on IFG), 84 (PM2.5 on type 2 diabetes), 83 (PM1 on IFG) and 89 (PM1 on type 2 diabetes) bacterial taxa could partially mediate the associations of PM2.5 and PM1 with IFG and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The relative abundance of most Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia bacteria were negatively associated with particulate matter (PM) concentrations and the risks of diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term exposure to PM may increase the risk of diabetes, and alterations in the gut microbiota partially explained these associations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

General Practice Center, Nanhai Hospital, Southern Medical University, Foshan 528200, China; Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China.Department of Chronic Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Department of Chronic Noncommunicable Disease Prevention and Control, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China.Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.Department of Occupational Health and Occupational Medicine, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515, China.General Practice Center, Nanhai Hospital, Southern Medical University, Foshan 528200, China.State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China.State Key Laboratory of Organ Failure Research, Microbiome Medicine Center, Division of Laboratory Medicine, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China. Electronic address: bioyanhe@gmail.com.Guangdong Provincial Institute of Public Health, Guangdong Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou 511430, China; General Practice Center, Nanhai Hospital, Southern Medical University, Foshan 528200, China. Electronic address: mawj@gdiph.org.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31202028

Citation

Liu, Tao, et al. "Gut Microbiota Partially Mediates the Effects of Fine Particulate Matter On Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence From a Population-based Epidemiological Study." Environment International, vol. 130, 2019, p. 104882.
Liu T, Chen X, Xu Y, et al. Gut microbiota partially mediates the effects of fine particulate matter on type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a population-based epidemiological study. Environ Int. 2019;130:104882.
Liu, T., Chen, X., Xu, Y., Wu, W., Tang, W., Chen, Z., Ji, G., Peng, J., Jiang, Q., Xiao, J., Li, X., Zeng, W., Xu, X., Hu, J., Guo, Y., Zou, F., Du, Q., Zhou, H., He, Y., & Ma, W. (2019). Gut microbiota partially mediates the effects of fine particulate matter on type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a population-based epidemiological study. Environment International, 130, 104882. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.05.076
Liu T, et al. Gut Microbiota Partially Mediates the Effects of Fine Particulate Matter On Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence From a Population-based Epidemiological Study. Environ Int. 2019;130:104882. PubMed PMID: 31202028.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gut microbiota partially mediates the effects of fine particulate matter on type 2 diabetes: Evidence from a population-based epidemiological study. AU - Liu,Tao, AU - Chen,Xiaojiao, AU - Xu,Yanjun, AU - Wu,Wei, AU - Tang,Wenli, AU - Chen,Zihui, AU - Ji,Guiyuan, AU - Peng,Jiewen, AU - Jiang,Qi, AU - Xiao,Jianpeng, AU - Li,Xing, AU - Zeng,Weilin, AU - Xu,Xiaojun, AU - Hu,Jianxiong, AU - Guo,Yuming, AU - Zou,Fei, AU - Du,Qingfeng, AU - Zhou,Hongwei, AU - He,Yan, AU - Ma,Wenjun, Y1 - 2019/06/12/ PY - 2019/03/20/received PY - 2019/05/29/revised PY - 2019/05/30/accepted PY - 2019/6/16/pubmed PY - 2020/3/5/medline PY - 2019/6/16/entrez KW - Ambient particles KW - Diabetes KW - Gut microbiota KW - PM(1) KW - PM(2.5) SP - 104882 EP - 104882 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 130 N2 - BACKGROUND: Experimental studies have indicated that alterations in the gut microbiota might play a role in the pathway of diabetes induction resulting from particulate matter pollution with aerodynamic diameters < 2.5 μm (PM2.5). However, few human studies have examined such experimental findings. Here, we examine the mediating effects of gut microbial dysbiosis on the associations between PM2.5 and particulate matter pollution with aerodynamic diameters < 1 μm (PM1) on diabetes using the Guangdong Gut Microbiome Project (GGMP) dataset. METHODS: A multistage cluster sampling method was employed to recruit adult participants from communities in Guangdong. Each participant was interviewed using a questionnaire, fasting blood and stool samples were collected, and the exposure to air pollutants was assessed using a spatiotemporal land-use regression model. The mediation analysis was conducted to estimate the associations among air pollutants, gut microbiota diversity and diabetes. RESULTS: Both PM2.5 and PM1 were positively associated with the risks of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or type 2 diabetes and negatively associated with alpha diversity indices of the gut microbiota. The mediation analyses indicated that the associations of PM2.5 and PM1 with the risk of type 2 diabetes were partially mediated by the decrease in gut microbiota diversity. Moreover, we found that 79 (PM2.5 on IFG), 84 (PM2.5 on type 2 diabetes), 83 (PM1 on IFG) and 89 (PM1 on type 2 diabetes) bacterial taxa could partially mediate the associations of PM2.5 and PM1 with IFG and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The relative abundance of most Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Verrucomicrobia bacteria were negatively associated with particulate matter (PM) concentrations and the risks of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term exposure to PM may increase the risk of diabetes, and alterations in the gut microbiota partially explained these associations. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31202028/Gut_microbiota_partially_mediates_the_effects_of_fine_particulate_matter_on_type_2_diabetes:_Evidence_from_a_population_based_epidemiological_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(19)31074-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -