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Running status and history: A self-report study.
Phys Ther Sport. 2019 Sep; 39:8-15.PT

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The purpose of the current study was to compare injury and running history among current and former runners who consider themselves either injured or uninjured.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional survey.

SETTING

Online survey, available to any individuals over the age of 18 who currently run (runners) or who once ran regularly but are no longer running (former runners).

PARTICIPANTS

312 participants (age 38 ± 12 years, 219 males, 89 females, 4 did not disclose) completed the survey.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

This study assessed injury incidence, consequences of injury such as time off, and reported injury diagnoses and treatments. Chi-square and frequency analyses were calculated to describe running status, injury counts, and response to injury.

RESULTS

Most participants (80%) reported 1 + running injury. 775 total injuries were reported. The four most common injuries were iliotibial band syndrome (34%), plantar fasciitis (30%), strained thigh/hip muscle (25%), and medial tibial stress syndrome (22%). About 40% of participants continued to run with these injuries.

CONCLUSIONS

Injury frequencies (80%) agreed with those reported in the literature. The results of this study also support the notion that running injuries exist on a continuum of severity and that the individual response to injury is complex and determined by various factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States.University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States. Electronic address: jfs@unlv.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31202143

Citation

Wiegand, Kristyne, et al. "Running Status and History: a Self-report Study." Physical Therapy in Sport : Official Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine, vol. 39, 2019, pp. 8-15.
Wiegand K, Mercer JA, Navalta JW, et al. Running status and history: A self-report study. Phys Ther Sport. 2019;39:8-15.
Wiegand, K., Mercer, J. A., Navalta, J. W., Pharr, J., Tandy, R., & Freedman Silvernail, J. (2019). Running status and history: A self-report study. Physical Therapy in Sport : Official Journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine, 39, 8-15. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ptsp.2019.06.003
Wiegand K, et al. Running Status and History: a Self-report Study. Phys Ther Sport. 2019;39:8-15. PubMed PMID: 31202143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Running status and history: A self-report study. AU - Wiegand,Kristyne, AU - Mercer,John A, AU - Navalta,James W, AU - Pharr,Jennifer, AU - Tandy,Richard, AU - Freedman Silvernail,Julia, Y1 - 2019/06/05/ PY - 2019/03/01/received PY - 2019/06/01/revised PY - 2019/06/01/accepted PY - 2019/6/16/pubmed PY - 2019/12/19/medline PY - 2019/6/16/entrez KW - Former runners KW - Injury response KW - Injury survey KW - Running injuries SP - 8 EP - 15 JF - Physical therapy in sport : official journal of the Association of Chartered Physiotherapists in Sports Medicine JO - Phys Ther Sport VL - 39 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the current study was to compare injury and running history among current and former runners who consider themselves either injured or uninjured. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Online survey, available to any individuals over the age of 18 who currently run (runners) or who once ran regularly but are no longer running (former runners). PARTICIPANTS: 312 participants (age 38 ± 12 years, 219 males, 89 females, 4 did not disclose) completed the survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: This study assessed injury incidence, consequences of injury such as time off, and reported injury diagnoses and treatments. Chi-square and frequency analyses were calculated to describe running status, injury counts, and response to injury. RESULTS: Most participants (80%) reported 1 + running injury. 775 total injuries were reported. The four most common injuries were iliotibial band syndrome (34%), plantar fasciitis (30%), strained thigh/hip muscle (25%), and medial tibial stress syndrome (22%). About 40% of participants continued to run with these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Injury frequencies (80%) agreed with those reported in the literature. The results of this study also support the notion that running injuries exist on a continuum of severity and that the individual response to injury is complex and determined by various factors. SN - 1873-1600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31202143/Running_status_and_history:_A_self-report_study L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1466-853X(19)30103-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -