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Evidence for interaction between genetic liability and childhood trauma in the development of psychotic symptoms.
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol 2019; 54(9):1045-1054SP

Abstract

PURPOSE

Whilst childhood trauma (CT) is a known risk factor across the spectrum of psychosis expression, little is known about possible interplay with genetic liability.

METHODS

The TwinssCan Study collected data in general population twins, focussing on expression of psychosis at the level of subthreshold psychotic experiences. A multilevel mixed-effects linear regression analysis was performed including 745 subjects to assess the interaction between genetic liability and CT. The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90-R) score of the co-twin was used as an indirect measure of genetic liability to psychopathology, while the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire Short-Form (CTQ-SF) was used to assess CT in the domains of physical, emotional and sexual abuse, as well as physical and emotional neglect. The Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) questionnaire was used to phenotypically characterize psychosis expression.

RESULTS

In the model using the CAPE total score, the interaction between CT and genetic liability was close to statistical significance (χ2 = 5.6, df = 2, p = 0.06). Analyses of CAPE subscales revealed a significant interaction between CT and genetic liability (χ2 = 8.8, df = 2, p = 0.012) for the CAPE-negative symptoms subscale, but not for the other two subscales (i.e. positive and depressive).

CONCLUSION

The results suggest that the impact of CT on subthreshold expression of psychosis, particularly in the negative subdomain, may be larger in the co-presence of significant genetic liability for psychopathology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. University Psychiatric Centre, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven - University Psychiatric Centre, Kortenberg, Belgium.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. University Psychiatric Centre, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven - University Psychiatric Centre, Kortenberg, Belgium.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Mondriaan Mental Health Trust, Heerlen, The Netherlands.University Psychiatric Centre, Catholic University Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Neurosciences, KU Leuven - University Psychiatric Centre, Kortenberg, Belgium.Centre of Human Genetics, University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ghent University Hospitals, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Open University of the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Department of Psychiatry, Interdisciplinary Center Psychopathology and Emotion Regulation (ICPE), University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. King's Health Partners Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, London, UK. Department of Psychiatry, Brain Centre Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience (MHeNS), European Graduate School of Neuroscience (EURON), Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Marjan.Drukker@MaastrichtUniversity.nl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31209522

Citation

Pinckaers, Florentina M E., et al. "Evidence for Interaction Between Genetic Liability and Childhood Trauma in the Development of Psychotic Symptoms." Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, vol. 54, no. 9, 2019, pp. 1045-1054.
Pinckaers FME, Rotee ILM, Nwosu CV, et al. Evidence for interaction between genetic liability and childhood trauma in the development of psychotic symptoms. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019;54(9):1045-1054.
Pinckaers, F. M. E., Rotee, I. L. M., Nwosu, C. V., Krolinski, P., Smeets, A. P. W., Gülöksüz, S., ... Drukker, M. (2019). Evidence for interaction between genetic liability and childhood trauma in the development of psychotic symptoms. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 54(9), pp. 1045-1054. doi:10.1007/s00127-019-01711-z.
Pinckaers FME, et al. Evidence for Interaction Between Genetic Liability and Childhood Trauma in the Development of Psychotic Symptoms. Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2019;54(9):1045-1054. PubMed PMID: 31209522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence for interaction between genetic liability and childhood trauma in the development of psychotic symptoms. AU - Pinckaers,Florentina M E, AU - Rotee,Iris L M, AU - Nwosu,C Vicky, AU - Krolinski,Pauline, AU - Smeets,Antonius P W, AU - Gülöksüz,Sinan, AU - de Jong,Lea, AU - Vaessen,Thomas S J, AU - Damen,Thomas, AU - Uittenboogaard,Aniek, AU - Schäfer,Annika T, AU - Menne-Lothmann,Claudia, AU - Decoster,Jeroen, AU - van Winkel,Ruud, AU - Collip,Dina, AU - Delespaul,Philippe, AU - De Hert,Marc, AU - Derom,Catherine, AU - Thiery,Evert, AU - Jacobs,Nele, AU - Wichers,Marieke, AU - Rutten,Bart P F, AU - van Os,Jim, AU - Drukker,Marjan, Y1 - 2019/06/17/ PY - 2018/07/06/received PY - 2019/04/08/accepted PY - 2019/6/19/pubmed PY - 2019/12/25/medline PY - 2019/6/19/entrez KW - Childhood trauma KW - General population KW - Genetic liability KW - Gene–environment interaction KW - Psychotic symptoms SP - 1045 EP - 1054 JF - Social psychiatry and psychiatric epidemiology JO - Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol VL - 54 IS - 9 N2 - PURPOSE: Whilst childhood trauma (CT) is a known risk factor across the spectrum of psychosis expression, little is known about possible interplay with genetic liability. METHODS: The TwinssCan Study collected data in general population twins, focussing on expression of psychosis at the level of subthreshold psychotic experiences. A multilevel mixed-effects linear regression analysis was performed including 745 subjects to assess the interaction between genetic liability and CT. The Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90-R) score of the co-twin was used as an indirect measure of genetic liability to psychopathology, while the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire Short-Form (CTQ-SF) was used to assess CT in the domains of physical, emotional and sexual abuse, as well as physical and emotional neglect. The Community Assessment of Psychic Experience (CAPE) questionnaire was used to phenotypically characterize psychosis expression. RESULTS: In the model using the CAPE total score, the interaction between CT and genetic liability was close to statistical significance (χ2 = 5.6, df = 2, p = 0.06). Analyses of CAPE subscales revealed a significant interaction between CT and genetic liability (χ2 = 8.8, df = 2, p = 0.012) for the CAPE-negative symptoms subscale, but not for the other two subscales (i.e. positive and depressive). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the impact of CT on subthreshold expression of psychosis, particularly in the negative subdomain, may be larger in the co-presence of significant genetic liability for psychopathology. SN - 1433-9285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31209522/Evidence_for_interaction_between_genetic_liability_and_childhood_trauma_in_the_development_of_psychotic_symptoms_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00127-019-01711-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -