Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those with Tinnitus.
J Am Acad Audiol. 2020 01; 31(1):6-16.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is well accepted among clinicians that maskers and hearing aids combined with counseling are generally helpful to tinnitus patients, but there are few controlled studies exploring the efficacy of maskers alone to decrease the prominence of tinnitus.

PURPOSE

We investigated the benefit of maskers for patients with chronic, bothersome tinnitus.

RESEARCH DESIGN

Crossover single-participant design, where each participant served as their own control.

STUDY SAMPLE

18 adults with subjective, nonpulsatile, sensorineural tinnitus.

INTERVENTION

Participants participated in two six-week trials: one with sound therapy and one without. No counseling was provided in either group. Masking devices were fit with sounds intended to reduce the tinnitus prominence.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS

Participants rated tinnitus loudness, tinnitus annoyance, and acceptability of the background sounds using a numeric 0-100 interval scale and completed the Tinnitus Primary Functions Questionnaire (TPFQ).

RESULTS

Three participants dropped out. On the total score of the TPFQ, 5 of 15 remaining participants (33%) showed a benefit. Using a derived score based on functions showing a handicap before the study, maskers benefit was observed in the areas of sleep (five of nine), hearing (three of eight), thoughts and emotions (three of four), and concentration (four of eight). The TPFQ and annoyance data complemented each other well.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates the benefit of partial masking, encouraging patients to seek help from audiologists interested in providing support for tinnitus patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL.Sivantos, Inc., Piscataway, NJ.Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Augustana College, Rock Island, IL.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA.Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA. Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31210635

Citation

Tyler, Richard S., et al. "Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those With Tinnitus." Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, vol. 31, no. 1, 2020, pp. 6-16.
Tyler RS, Perreau A, Powers T, et al. Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those with Tinnitus. J Am Acad Audiol. 2020;31(1):6-16.
Tyler, R. S., Perreau, A., Powers, T., Watts, A., Owen, R., Ji, H., & Mancini, P. C. (2020). Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those with Tinnitus. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 31(1), 6-16. https://doi.org/10.3766/jaaa.18027
Tyler RS, et al. Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those With Tinnitus. J Am Acad Audiol. 2020;31(1):6-16. PubMed PMID: 31210635.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tinnitus Sound Therapy Trial Shows Effectiveness for Those with Tinnitus. AU - Tyler,Richard S, AU - Perreau,Ann, AU - Powers,Thomas, AU - Watts,Alexandra, AU - Owen,Rachael, AU - Ji,Helena, AU - Mancini,Patricia C, Y1 - 2019/06/14/ PY - 2019/6/19/pubmed PY - 2021/5/4/medline PY - 2019/6/19/entrez SP - 6 EP - 16 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Audiology JO - J Am Acad Audiol VL - 31 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is well accepted among clinicians that maskers and hearing aids combined with counseling are generally helpful to tinnitus patients, but there are few controlled studies exploring the efficacy of maskers alone to decrease the prominence of tinnitus. PURPOSE: We investigated the benefit of maskers for patients with chronic, bothersome tinnitus. RESEARCH DESIGN: Crossover single-participant design, where each participant served as their own control. STUDY SAMPLE: 18 adults with subjective, nonpulsatile, sensorineural tinnitus. INTERVENTION: Participants participated in two six-week trials: one with sound therapy and one without. No counseling was provided in either group. Masking devices were fit with sounds intended to reduce the tinnitus prominence. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Participants rated tinnitus loudness, tinnitus annoyance, and acceptability of the background sounds using a numeric 0-100 interval scale and completed the Tinnitus Primary Functions Questionnaire (TPFQ). RESULTS: Three participants dropped out. On the total score of the TPFQ, 5 of 15 remaining participants (33%) showed a benefit. Using a derived score based on functions showing a handicap before the study, maskers benefit was observed in the areas of sleep (five of nine), hearing (three of eight), thoughts and emotions (three of four), and concentration (four of eight). The TPFQ and annoyance data complemented each other well. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the benefit of partial masking, encouraging patients to seek help from audiologists interested in providing support for tinnitus patients. SN - 2157-3107 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31210635/Tinnitus_Sound_Therapy_Trial_Shows_Effectiveness_for_Those_with_Tinnitus_ L2 - https://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.3766/jaaa.18027 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -