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Vaginal microbiota of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis: Are they different from normal microbiota?
Microb Pathog. 2019 Sep; 134:103599.MP

Abstract

Vaginal microbiota contributes in maintaining and protecting the urogenital niche from infections and their sequelae. Despite extensive research, microbiome studies have often ignored asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The present study aimed to explore the cultivable vaginal bacterial and mycological communities in women asymptomatic for BV and VVC using multiplex PCR and species-specific PCR. Vaginal swabs collected from 199 participants asymptomatic for urogenital infections, scored by Nugent criteria indicated 73.9% had normal microbiota, 11.6% intermediate and 14.5% BV. The most frequent Lactobacillus species in normal women were L. iners (69.4%), L. crispatus (24.5%), L. reuteri (20.4%). Women with BV colonized L. iners (62.1%); L. rhamnosus (41.4%); L. salivarius (13.7%) and L. reuteri (7.2%). Furthermore, L. crispatus was associated with normal microbiota, whereas L. iners was a frequent member of normal and dysbiotic microbiota. Lactobacillus abundance and species richness reduced in asymptomatic BV. Also L. crispatus, L. fermentum, L. acidophilus and L. delbruckii were absent in these women. L. iners significantly co-existed with other Lactobacillus species, indicating its failure in independently maintaining the healthy vaginal niche. Of 30.4% women detected with Candida, 72.1% constituted non-albicans Candida. Predominance of C. albicans increased from 18.4% in healthy to 60% in women with asymptomatic BV; whereas distribution of BV related bacteria did not vary across the groups. Heterogeneous population of lactobacilli in 80.8% of normal women calls attention towards cumulative effects of these species in safeguarding the vaginal microenvironment. Since the microbiota of asymptomatic BV was different from healthy, screening and management could be encouraged to avoid further complications of infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Parel, Mumbai, India.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College, Parel, Mumbai, India.Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Seth Gordhandas Sunderdas Medical College, Parel, Mumbai, India.ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Parel, Mumbai, India.School of Biological Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), HBNI, PO: Bhimpur-Padanpur Via Jatni, Khurda, 752050, Odisha, India.ICMR-National Institute for Research in Reproductive Health, Parel, Mumbai, India. Electronic address: aranhac@nirrh.res.in.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31212037

Citation

Pramanick, Rinku, et al. "Vaginal Microbiota of Asymptomatic Bacterial Vaginosis and Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Are They Different From Normal Microbiota?" Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 134, 2019, p. 103599.
Pramanick R, Mayadeo N, Warke H, et al. Vaginal microbiota of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis: Are they different from normal microbiota? Microb Pathog. 2019;134:103599.
Pramanick, R., Mayadeo, N., Warke, H., Begum, S., Aich, P., & Aranha, C. (2019). Vaginal microbiota of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis: Are they different from normal microbiota? Microbial Pathogenesis, 134, 103599. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2019.103599
Pramanick R, et al. Vaginal Microbiota of Asymptomatic Bacterial Vaginosis and Vulvovaginal Candidiasis: Are They Different From Normal Microbiota. Microb Pathog. 2019;134:103599. PubMed PMID: 31212037.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vaginal microbiota of asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis and vulvovaginal candidiasis: Are they different from normal microbiota? AU - Pramanick,Rinku, AU - Mayadeo,Niranjan, AU - Warke,Himangi, AU - Begum,Shahina, AU - Aich,Palok, AU - Aranha,Clara, Y1 - 2019/06/15/ PY - 2019/02/07/received PY - 2019/03/29/revised PY - 2019/06/11/accepted PY - 2019/6/19/pubmed PY - 2020/1/7/medline PY - 2019/6/19/entrez KW - Asymptomatic KW - Bacterial vaginosis KW - Candida KW - Lactobacillus KW - Microbiota KW - Vagina KW - Vulvovaginal candidiasis SP - 103599 EP - 103599 JF - Microbial pathogenesis JO - Microb Pathog VL - 134 N2 - Vaginal microbiota contributes in maintaining and protecting the urogenital niche from infections and their sequelae. Despite extensive research, microbiome studies have often ignored asymptomatic bacterial vaginosis (BV) and vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC). The present study aimed to explore the cultivable vaginal bacterial and mycological communities in women asymptomatic for BV and VVC using multiplex PCR and species-specific PCR. Vaginal swabs collected from 199 participants asymptomatic for urogenital infections, scored by Nugent criteria indicated 73.9% had normal microbiota, 11.6% intermediate and 14.5% BV. The most frequent Lactobacillus species in normal women were L. iners (69.4%), L. crispatus (24.5%), L. reuteri (20.4%). Women with BV colonized L. iners (62.1%); L. rhamnosus (41.4%); L. salivarius (13.7%) and L. reuteri (7.2%). Furthermore, L. crispatus was associated with normal microbiota, whereas L. iners was a frequent member of normal and dysbiotic microbiota. Lactobacillus abundance and species richness reduced in asymptomatic BV. Also L. crispatus, L. fermentum, L. acidophilus and L. delbruckii were absent in these women. L. iners significantly co-existed with other Lactobacillus species, indicating its failure in independently maintaining the healthy vaginal niche. Of 30.4% women detected with Candida, 72.1% constituted non-albicans Candida. Predominance of C. albicans increased from 18.4% in healthy to 60% in women with asymptomatic BV; whereas distribution of BV related bacteria did not vary across the groups. Heterogeneous population of lactobacilli in 80.8% of normal women calls attention towards cumulative effects of these species in safeguarding the vaginal microenvironment. Since the microbiota of asymptomatic BV was different from healthy, screening and management could be encouraged to avoid further complications of infections. SN - 1096-1208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31212037/Vaginal_microbiota_of_asymptomatic_bacterial_vaginosis_and_vulvovaginal_candidiasis:_Are_they_different_from_normal_microbiota L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0882-4010(19)30244-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -