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Inkjet-printed stretchable and low voltage synaptic transistor array.
Nat Commun 2019; 10(1):2676NC

Abstract

Wearable and skin electronics benefit from mechanically soft and stretchable materials to conform to curved and dynamic surfaces, thereby enabling seamless integration with the human body. However, such materials are challenging to process using traditional microelectronics techniques. Here, stretchable transistor arrays are patterned exclusively from solution by inkjet printing of polymers and carbon nanotubes. The additive, non-contact and maskless nature of inkjet printing provides a simple, inexpensive and scalable route for stacking and patterning these chemically-sensitive materials over large areas. The transistors, which are stable at ambient conditions, display mobilities as high as 30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and currents per channel width of 0.2 mA cm-1 at operation voltages as low as 1 V, owing to the ionic character of their printed gate dielectric. Furthermore, these transistors with double-layer capacitive dielectric can mimic the synaptic behavior of neurons, making them interesting for conformal brain-machine interfaces and other wearable bioelectronics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA, 94305-4125, USA. Department of Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, 3001, Leuven, Belgium.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305-4034, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, UK.Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA, 94305-4125, USA. Department of Natural Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Holmgatan 10, Sundsvall, 852 30, Sweden.Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA, 94305-4125, USA. Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB-CISC), Campus de la UAB, 08193, Bellaterra, Spain.Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305-4034, USA.Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 350 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA, 94305-4125, USA. Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, 5640S Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, 130 Samseong-ro, Suwon, 16678, South Korea. youngjun.yun@gmail.com.Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, 443 Via Ortega, Stanford, CA, 94305-4125, USA. zbao@stanford.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31213599

Citation

Molina-Lopez, F, et al. "Inkjet-printed Stretchable and Low Voltage Synaptic Transistor Array." Nature Communications, vol. 10, no. 1, 2019, p. 2676.
Molina-Lopez F, Gao TZ, Kraft U, et al. Inkjet-printed stretchable and low voltage synaptic transistor array. Nat Commun. 2019;10(1):2676.
Molina-Lopez, F., Gao, T. Z., Kraft, U., Zhu, C., Öhlund, T., Pfattner, R., ... Bao, Z. (2019). Inkjet-printed stretchable and low voltage synaptic transistor array. Nature Communications, 10(1), p. 2676. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10569-3.
Molina-Lopez F, et al. Inkjet-printed Stretchable and Low Voltage Synaptic Transistor Array. Nat Commun. 2019 06 18;10(1):2676. PubMed PMID: 31213599.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inkjet-printed stretchable and low voltage synaptic transistor array. AU - Molina-Lopez,F, AU - Gao,T Z, AU - Kraft,U, AU - Zhu,C, AU - Öhlund,T, AU - Pfattner,R, AU - Feig,V R, AU - Kim,Y, AU - Wang,S, AU - Yun,Y, AU - Bao,Z, Y1 - 2019/06/18/ PY - 2019/01/19/received PY - 2019/05/15/accepted PY - 2019/6/20/entrez PY - 2019/6/20/pubmed PY - 2019/7/10/medline SP - 2676 EP - 2676 JF - Nature communications JO - Nat Commun VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Wearable and skin electronics benefit from mechanically soft and stretchable materials to conform to curved and dynamic surfaces, thereby enabling seamless integration with the human body. However, such materials are challenging to process using traditional microelectronics techniques. Here, stretchable transistor arrays are patterned exclusively from solution by inkjet printing of polymers and carbon nanotubes. The additive, non-contact and maskless nature of inkjet printing provides a simple, inexpensive and scalable route for stacking and patterning these chemically-sensitive materials over large areas. The transistors, which are stable at ambient conditions, display mobilities as high as 30 cm2 V-1 s-1 and currents per channel width of 0.2 mA cm-1 at operation voltages as low as 1 V, owing to the ionic character of their printed gate dielectric. Furthermore, these transistors with double-layer capacitive dielectric can mimic the synaptic behavior of neurons, making them interesting for conformal brain-machine interfaces and other wearable bioelectronics. SN - 2041-1723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31213599/Inkjet_printed_stretchable_and_low_voltage_synaptic_transistor_array_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10569-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -