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Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes on purchases and dietary intake: Systematic review and meta-analysis.
Obes Rev. 2019 09; 20(9):1187-1204.OR

Abstract

The aim was to conduct a systematic review of real-world sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax evaluations and examine the overall impact on beverage purchases and dietary intake by meta-analysis. Medline, EconLit, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases were searched up to June 2018. SSB tax evaluations from any formal jurisdiction from cities to national governments were eligible if there was a comparison between pre-post tax (n = 11) or taxed and untaxed jurisdiction(s) (n = 6). The consumption outcome comprised sales, purchasing, and intake (reported by volume, energy, or frequency). Taxed and untaxed beverage consumption outcomes were examined separately by meta-analysis with adjustment for the size of each tax. The study was registered at PROSPERO (CRD42018100620). The equivalent of a 10% SSB tax was associated with an average decline in beverage purchases and dietary intake of 10.0% (95% CI: -5.0% to -14.7%, n = 17 studies, 6 jurisdictions) with considerable heterogeneity between results (I2 = 97%).The equivalent of a 10% SSB tax was also associated with a nonsignificant 1.9% increase in total untaxed beverage consumption (eg, water) (95% CI: -2.1% to 6.1%, n = 6 studies, 4 jurisdictions). Based on real-world evaluations, SSB taxes introduced in jurisdictions around the world appear to have been effective in reducing SSB purchases and dietary intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.Department of Economics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.Department of Public Health, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31218808

Citation

Teng, Andrea M., et al. "Impact of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Taxes On Purchases and Dietary Intake: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 20, no. 9, 2019, pp. 1187-1204.
Teng AM, Jones AC, Mizdrak A, et al. Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes on purchases and dietary intake: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Obes Rev. 2019;20(9):1187-1204.
Teng, A. M., Jones, A. C., Mizdrak, A., Signal, L., Genç, M., & Wilson, N. (2019). Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes on purchases and dietary intake: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 20(9), 1187-1204. https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12868
Teng AM, et al. Impact of Sugar-sweetened Beverage Taxes On Purchases and Dietary Intake: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Obes Rev. 2019;20(9):1187-1204. PubMed PMID: 31218808.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of sugar-sweetened beverage taxes on purchases and dietary intake: Systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Teng,Andrea M, AU - Jones,Amanda C, AU - Mizdrak,Anja, AU - Signal,Louise, AU - Genç,Murat, AU - Wilson,Nick, Y1 - 2019/06/19/ PY - 2019/01/13/received PY - 2019/03/27/revised PY - 2019/03/29/accepted PY - 2019/6/21/pubmed PY - 2020/7/7/medline PY - 2019/6/21/entrez KW - evaluation KW - excise KW - meta-analysis KW - natural experiment KW - soft drinks KW - tax SP - 1187 EP - 1204 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 20 IS - 9 N2 - The aim was to conduct a systematic review of real-world sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) tax evaluations and examine the overall impact on beverage purchases and dietary intake by meta-analysis. Medline, EconLit, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases were searched up to June 2018. SSB tax evaluations from any formal jurisdiction from cities to national governments were eligible if there was a comparison between pre-post tax (n = 11) or taxed and untaxed jurisdiction(s) (n = 6). The consumption outcome comprised sales, purchasing, and intake (reported by volume, energy, or frequency). Taxed and untaxed beverage consumption outcomes were examined separately by meta-analysis with adjustment for the size of each tax. The study was registered at PROSPERO (CRD42018100620). The equivalent of a 10% SSB tax was associated with an average decline in beverage purchases and dietary intake of 10.0% (95% CI: -5.0% to -14.7%, n = 17 studies, 6 jurisdictions) with considerable heterogeneity between results (I2 = 97%).The equivalent of a 10% SSB tax was also associated with a nonsignificant 1.9% increase in total untaxed beverage consumption (eg, water) (95% CI: -2.1% to 6.1%, n = 6 studies, 4 jurisdictions). Based on real-world evaluations, SSB taxes introduced in jurisdictions around the world appear to have been effective in reducing SSB purchases and dietary intake. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31218808/Impact_of_sugar_sweetened_beverage_taxes_on_purchases_and_dietary_intake:_Systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -