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Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal.
Matern Child Nutr 2019; 15 Suppl 4:e12754MC

Abstract

Introducing breast milk substitutes (BMS) in the first days after birth can increase infant morbidity and reduce duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding. This study assessed determinants of BMS feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted among mothers upon discharge from health facilities after delivery: 304 mothers in Kathmandu Valley and 306 mothers in Phnom Penh participated. On the basis of a conceptual framework for prelacteal feeding, multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with BMS feeding prior to facility discharge. In both Phnom Penh and Kathmandu Valley, feeds of BMS were reported by over half of mothers (56.9% and 55.9%, respectively). Receiving a health professional's recommendation to use BMS increased the odds of BMS feeding in both Kathmandu Valley and Phnom Penh (odds ratio: 24.87; confidence interval [6.05, 102.29]; odds ratio: 2.42; CI [1.20, 4.91], respectively). In Kathmandu Valley, recommendations from friends/family and caesarean delivery were also associated with BMS use among mothers. Early initiation of breastfeeding and higher parity were protective against the use of BMS in Kathmandu Valley. Breastfeeding support from a health professional lowered the odds of BMS feeding among newborns. Exposure to BMS promotions outside the health system was prevalent in Phnom Penh (84.6%) and Kathmandu Valley (27.0%) but was not associated with BMS feeds among newborns. Establishment of successful breastfeeding should be prioritized before discharging mothers from delivery facilities, and health professionals should be equipped to support and encourage breastfeeding among all new mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA.Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK.Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA.Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA.Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA.Helen Keller International, New York, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31225714

Citation

Champeny, Mary, et al. "Predictors of Breast Milk Substitute Feeding Among Newborns in Delivery Facilities in Urban Cambodia and Nepal." Maternal & Child Nutrition, vol. 15 Suppl 4, 2019, pp. e12754.
Champeny M, Pries AM, Hou K, et al. Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal. Matern Child Nutr. 2019;15 Suppl 4:e12754.
Champeny, M., Pries, A. M., Hou, K., Adhikary, I., Zehner, E., & Huffman, S. L. (2019). Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 15 Suppl 4, pp. e12754. doi:10.1111/mcn.12754.
Champeny M, et al. Predictors of Breast Milk Substitute Feeding Among Newborns in Delivery Facilities in Urban Cambodia and Nepal. Matern Child Nutr. 2019;15 Suppl 4:e12754. PubMed PMID: 31225714.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of breast milk substitute feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in urban Cambodia and Nepal. AU - Champeny,Mary, AU - Pries,Alissa M, AU - Hou,Kroeun, AU - Adhikary,Indu, AU - Zehner,Elizabeth, AU - Huffman,Sandra L, PY - 2018/05/15/received PY - 2018/10/19/revised PY - 2018/11/06/accepted PY - 2019/6/22/entrez PY - 2019/6/22/pubmed PY - 2020/1/17/medline KW - breast milk substitutes KW - breastfeeding KW - breastfeeding initiation KW - infant feeding behaviour KW - infant feeding decisions KW - infant formula SP - e12754 EP - e12754 JF - Maternal & child nutrition JO - Matern Child Nutr VL - 15 Suppl 4 N2 - Introducing breast milk substitutes (BMS) in the first days after birth can increase infant morbidity and reduce duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding. This study assessed determinants of BMS feeding among newborns in delivery facilities in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, and Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted among mothers upon discharge from health facilities after delivery: 304 mothers in Kathmandu Valley and 306 mothers in Phnom Penh participated. On the basis of a conceptual framework for prelacteal feeding, multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with BMS feeding prior to facility discharge. In both Phnom Penh and Kathmandu Valley, feeds of BMS were reported by over half of mothers (56.9% and 55.9%, respectively). Receiving a health professional's recommendation to use BMS increased the odds of BMS feeding in both Kathmandu Valley and Phnom Penh (odds ratio: 24.87; confidence interval [6.05, 102.29]; odds ratio: 2.42; CI [1.20, 4.91], respectively). In Kathmandu Valley, recommendations from friends/family and caesarean delivery were also associated with BMS use among mothers. Early initiation of breastfeeding and higher parity were protective against the use of BMS in Kathmandu Valley. Breastfeeding support from a health professional lowered the odds of BMS feeding among newborns. Exposure to BMS promotions outside the health system was prevalent in Phnom Penh (84.6%) and Kathmandu Valley (27.0%) but was not associated with BMS feeds among newborns. Establishment of successful breastfeeding should be prioritized before discharging mothers from delivery facilities, and health professionals should be equipped to support and encourage breastfeeding among all new mothers. SN - 1740-8709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31225714/Predictors_of_breast_milk_substitute_feeding_among_newborns_in_delivery_facilities_in_urban_Cambodia_and_Nepal_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mcn.12754 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -