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Centenary of Tretiakoff's thesis on the morphology of Parkinson's disease, evolved on the grounds of encephalitis lethargica pathology.
J Hist Neurosci. 2019 Oct-Dec; 28(4):387-398.JH

Abstract

In his Thèse de Paris (1919) Konstantin Tretiakoff (1892-1956) described the two main morphological lesions in Parkinson's disease: the loss of pigmented nerve cells in the Substantia nigra and the intracellular inclusion bodies in idiopathic paralysis agitans, calling them "Corps de Lewy," which already had been described by F. H. Lewy in 1912. Tretiakoff's findings on idiopathic Parkinson's disease were confirmed years later by Rolf Hassler in his dissertation on anatomy and pathology of Substantia nigra in Berlin (1938, 1939). German authors in the 1920s underestimated the significance of both findings (Bielschowsky, 1922; Lewy 1923/1924; Spatz 1927), especially Lewy himself. Lewy (1923) and other German neurologists and neuropathologists like Felix Stern (1922, 1928), Goldstein (1922), and Spatz (1927; Luksch & Spatz, 1923) acknowledged the typical Nigra-lesions only for postencephalitic Parkinsonism. It is argued that Tretiakoff's selective attention for the Substantia nigra was guided by the frequency of epidemic encephalitis lethargica and its preponderance of nigral pathology. This impression can be derived from Tretiakoff's early paper on that disease (Marie & Tretiakoff, 1918) and from Paul Foley's opus magnum (2018). Two outstanding neurologists dedicated to this issue are called into memory: Gabrielle Lévy, the successor of Tretiakoff in the Salpêtrière laboratory, and Felix Stern, who died in 1942 as a victim of Nazi terror. The eponym Lewy-bodies went back to Lafora and Tretiakoff ("Corps de Lewy"). Newly expressed doubts about Lewy's primacy or Lafora's credit for the eponym (Lafora-bodies since 1911) can be refuted with the studies of Greenfield and Bosanquet (1953) and Greenfield (1963) by illustrating their different staining properties.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Schlossparkklinik Berlin , Berlin , Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Biography
Historical Article
Journal Article
Portrait

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31226240

Citation

Holdorff, Bernd. "Centenary of Tretiakoff's Thesis On the Morphology of Parkinson's Disease, Evolved On the Grounds of Encephalitis Lethargica Pathology." Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, vol. 28, no. 4, 2019, pp. 387-398.
Holdorff B. Centenary of Tretiakoff's thesis on the morphology of Parkinson's disease, evolved on the grounds of encephalitis lethargica pathology. J Hist Neurosci. 2019;28(4):387-398.
Holdorff, B. (2019). Centenary of Tretiakoff's thesis on the morphology of Parkinson's disease, evolved on the grounds of encephalitis lethargica pathology. Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, 28(4), 387-398. https://doi.org/10.1080/0964704X.2019.1622361
Holdorff B. Centenary of Tretiakoff's Thesis On the Morphology of Parkinson's Disease, Evolved On the Grounds of Encephalitis Lethargica Pathology. J Hist Neurosci. 2019 Oct-Dec;28(4):387-398. PubMed PMID: 31226240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Centenary of Tretiakoff's thesis on the morphology of Parkinson's disease, evolved on the grounds of encephalitis lethargica pathology. A1 - Holdorff,Bernd, Y1 - 2019/06/21/ PY - 2019/6/22/pubmed PY - 2020/6/24/medline PY - 2019/6/22/entrez KW - Encephalitis lethargica KW - Konstantin Tretiakoff KW - Lafora-bodies KW - Lewy-bodies KW - Parkinson’s disease KW - Substantia nigra KW - postencephalitic Parkinsonism SP - 387 EP - 398 JF - Journal of the history of the neurosciences JO - J Hist Neurosci VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - In his Thèse de Paris (1919) Konstantin Tretiakoff (1892-1956) described the two main morphological lesions in Parkinson's disease: the loss of pigmented nerve cells in the Substantia nigra and the intracellular inclusion bodies in idiopathic paralysis agitans, calling them "Corps de Lewy," which already had been described by F. H. Lewy in 1912. Tretiakoff's findings on idiopathic Parkinson's disease were confirmed years later by Rolf Hassler in his dissertation on anatomy and pathology of Substantia nigra in Berlin (1938, 1939). German authors in the 1920s underestimated the significance of both findings (Bielschowsky, 1922; Lewy 1923/1924; Spatz 1927), especially Lewy himself. Lewy (1923) and other German neurologists and neuropathologists like Felix Stern (1922, 1928), Goldstein (1922), and Spatz (1927; Luksch & Spatz, 1923) acknowledged the typical Nigra-lesions only for postencephalitic Parkinsonism. It is argued that Tretiakoff's selective attention for the Substantia nigra was guided by the frequency of epidemic encephalitis lethargica and its preponderance of nigral pathology. This impression can be derived from Tretiakoff's early paper on that disease (Marie & Tretiakoff, 1918) and from Paul Foley's opus magnum (2018). Two outstanding neurologists dedicated to this issue are called into memory: Gabrielle Lévy, the successor of Tretiakoff in the Salpêtrière laboratory, and Felix Stern, who died in 1942 as a victim of Nazi terror. The eponym Lewy-bodies went back to Lafora and Tretiakoff ("Corps de Lewy"). Newly expressed doubts about Lewy's primacy or Lafora's credit for the eponym (Lafora-bodies since 1911) can be refuted with the studies of Greenfield and Bosanquet (1953) and Greenfield (1963) by illustrating their different staining properties. SN - 1744-5213 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31226240/Centenary_of_Tretiakoff's_thesis_on_the_morphology_of_Parkinson's_disease_evolved_on_the_grounds_of_encephalitis_lethargica_pathology_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0964704X.2019.1622361 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -