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Meat consumption in midlife and risk of cognitive impairment in old age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.
Eur J Nutr. 2020 Jun; 59(4):1729-1738.EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Epidemiological studies directly investigating the association between different types of meat intake and cognitive impairment are limited. We, therefore, examined this association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

METHODS

In total, 16,948 participants were included in analysis. Diet was measured by a 165-item semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (1993-1998) when participants were 45-74 years. Cognitive impairment was defined using a Singapore modified version of Mini-Mental State Examination during follow-up three visits (2014-2016) when participants were 61-96 years. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI).

RESULTS

Cognitive impairment was present in 2443 (14.4%) participants. Compared to the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.32, P for trend = 0.009), while the corresponding value for poultry intake was 0.89 (95% CI 0.78-1.02, P for trend = 0.10). Higher fresh fish/shellfish was associated with a lower risk of cognitive impairment (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.00, P for trend = 0.03), while preserved fish/shellfish intake was associated with a higher risk (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.04-1.36, P for trend = 0.01).

CONCLUSION

This study found that a higher intake of red meat in midlife was associated with increased likelihood of cognitive impairment in later life, while substitution of red meat intake with poultry or fresh fish/shellfish was associated with reduced risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.Department of Psychological Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Environment and Health and State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health (Incubating), School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China. panan@hust.edu.cn.Health Services and Systems Research, Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, Singapore. woonpuay.koh@duke-nus.edu.sg. Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore. woonpuay.koh@duke-nus.edu.sg.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31227861

Citation

Jiang, Yi-Wen, et al. "Meat Consumption in Midlife and Risk of Cognitive Impairment in Old Age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study." European Journal of Nutrition, vol. 59, no. 4, 2020, pp. 1729-1738.
Jiang YW, Sheng LT, Pan XF, et al. Meat consumption in midlife and risk of cognitive impairment in old age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Eur J Nutr. 2020;59(4):1729-1738.
Jiang, Y. W., Sheng, L. T., Pan, X. F., Feng, L., Yuan, J. M., Pan, A., & Koh, W. P. (2020). Meat consumption in midlife and risk of cognitive impairment in old age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. European Journal of Nutrition, 59(4), 1729-1738. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-02031-3
Jiang YW, et al. Meat Consumption in Midlife and Risk of Cognitive Impairment in Old Age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Eur J Nutr. 2020;59(4):1729-1738. PubMed PMID: 31227861.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat consumption in midlife and risk of cognitive impairment in old age: the Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Jiang,Yi-Wen, AU - Sheng,Li-Ting, AU - Pan,Xiong-Fei, AU - Feng,Lei, AU - Yuan,Jian-Min, AU - Pan,An, AU - Koh,Woon-Puay, Y1 - 2019/06/21/ PY - 2018/07/30/received PY - 2019/06/15/accepted PY - 2019/6/23/pubmed PY - 2021/3/27/medline PY - 2019/6/23/entrez KW - Cognitive impairment KW - Cohort study KW - Fish/shellfish KW - Poultry KW - Red meat SP - 1729 EP - 1738 JF - European journal of nutrition JO - Eur J Nutr VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - PURPOSE: Epidemiological studies directly investigating the association between different types of meat intake and cognitive impairment are limited. We, therefore, examined this association in the Singapore Chinese Health Study. METHODS: In total, 16,948 participants were included in analysis. Diet was measured by a 165-item semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire at baseline (1993-1998) when participants were 45-74 years. Cognitive impairment was defined using a Singapore modified version of Mini-Mental State Examination during follow-up three visits (2014-2016) when participants were 61-96 years. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Cognitive impairment was present in 2443 (14.4%) participants. Compared to the lowest quartile, the highest quartile of red meat intake was associated with increased risk of cognitive impairment (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.01-1.32, P for trend = 0.009), while the corresponding value for poultry intake was 0.89 (95% CI 0.78-1.02, P for trend = 0.10). Higher fresh fish/shellfish was associated with a lower risk of cognitive impairment (OR 0.88, 95% CI 0.77-1.00, P for trend = 0.03), while preserved fish/shellfish intake was associated with a higher risk (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.04-1.36, P for trend = 0.01). CONCLUSION: This study found that a higher intake of red meat in midlife was associated with increased likelihood of cognitive impairment in later life, while substitution of red meat intake with poultry or fresh fish/shellfish was associated with reduced risk. SN - 1436-6215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31227861/Meat_consumption_in_midlife_and_risk_of_cognitive_impairment_in_old_age:_the_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-02031-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -