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Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity on Anxiety Symptoms in Children.

Abstract

Anxiety sensitivity (AS), namely the fear of anxiety symptoms, has been described as a precursor of sub-threshold anxiety levels. Sexton et al. (2003) posited that increased AS would arise from an elevated neuroticism and that both would act as vulnerability factors for panic disorder (PD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms. Accordingly, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the applicability of this model to a pediatric population and (2) examine the influences of the other Big-Five personality dimensions on the four lower-order dimensions of AS (cognitive, physical, control, and physical) and on social phobia (SP), separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and depression symptoms. 200 children (104 girls) aged between 8 and 12 years old (mean age = 132.52 months, SD = 14.5) completed the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (Silverman et al., 1991), the Big Five Questionnaire for Children (Barbaranelli et al., 2003), and the Revised's Children Anxiety and Depression Scale (Chorpita et al., 2000). Regression analyses confirmed that AS and neuroticism together significantly predicted the presence of PD, OCD, and GAD symptoms but also SP, SAD, and depression symptoms. Moreover, neuroticism interacted with extraversion, conscientiousness and agreeableness to significantly predict SP, GAD, and depression. Surprisingly, the global AS score was only predicted by agreeableness, while AS dimensions also specifically related to openness. Finally, AS dimensions did not predict the presence of specific anxiety symptoms. To conclude, the predicting model of anxiety symptoms in children sets neuroticism and AS on the same level, with an unexpected influence of agreeableness on AS, raising the importance of other trait-like factors in the definition of such models. Moreover, AS should be considered as a unitary construct when predicting the presence of anxiety symptoms in children. Future interventions must consider these associations to help children detect and recognize the symptoms of their anxiety and help them to interpret them correctly.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. National Fund for Human Research (FRESH), National Fund for Scientific Research, Brussels, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium.

    ,

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium.

    ,

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium. Laboratory of Phonetics, Research Institute for Language Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium.

    ,

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. National Fund for Human Research (FRESH), National Fund for Scientific Research, Brussels, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium.

    ,

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium. Laboratory C2S, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France.

    Department of Cognitive Psychology and Neuropsychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education, University of Mons, Mons, Belgium. Interdisciplinary Research Center in Psychophysiology and Cognitive Electrophysiology, Mons, Belgium.

    Source

    Frontiers in psychology 10: 2019 pg 1185

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    31231271

    Citation

    Wauthia, Erika, et al. "Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity On Anxiety Symptoms in Children." Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 10, 2019, p. 1185.
    Wauthia E, Lefebvre L, Huet K, et al. Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity on Anxiety Symptoms in Children. Front Psychol. 2019;10:1185.
    Wauthia, E., Lefebvre, L., Huet, K., Blekic, W., El Bouragui, K., & Rossignol, M. (2019). Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity on Anxiety Symptoms in Children. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, p. 1185. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01185.
    Wauthia E, et al. Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity On Anxiety Symptoms in Children. Front Psychol. 2019;10:1185. PubMed PMID: 31231271.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Examining the Hierarchical Influences of the Big-Five Dimensions and Anxiety Sensitivity on Anxiety Symptoms in Children. AU - Wauthia,Erika, AU - Lefebvre,Laurent, AU - Huet,Kathy, AU - Blekic,Wivine, AU - El Bouragui,Khira, AU - Rossignol,Mandy, Y1 - 2019/06/04/ PY - 2019/01/07/received PY - 2019/05/06/accepted PY - 2019/6/25/entrez PY - 2019/6/25/pubmed PY - 2019/6/25/medline KW - Big-Five personality KW - anxiety sensitivity KW - anxiety symptoms KW - children KW - neuroticism KW - vulnerability factors SP - 1185 EP - 1185 JF - Frontiers in psychology JO - Front Psychol VL - 10 N2 - Anxiety sensitivity (AS), namely the fear of anxiety symptoms, has been described as a precursor of sub-threshold anxiety levels. Sexton et al. (2003) posited that increased AS would arise from an elevated neuroticism and that both would act as vulnerability factors for panic disorder (PD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) symptoms. Accordingly, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the applicability of this model to a pediatric population and (2) examine the influences of the other Big-Five personality dimensions on the four lower-order dimensions of AS (cognitive, physical, control, and physical) and on social phobia (SP), separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and depression symptoms. 200 children (104 girls) aged between 8 and 12 years old (mean age = 132.52 months, SD = 14.5) completed the Childhood Anxiety Sensitivity Index (Silverman et al., 1991), the Big Five Questionnaire for Children (Barbaranelli et al., 2003), and the Revised's Children Anxiety and Depression Scale (Chorpita et al., 2000). Regression analyses confirmed that AS and neuroticism together significantly predicted the presence of PD, OCD, and GAD symptoms but also SP, SAD, and depression symptoms. Moreover, neuroticism interacted with extraversion, conscientiousness and agreeableness to significantly predict SP, GAD, and depression. Surprisingly, the global AS score was only predicted by agreeableness, while AS dimensions also specifically related to openness. Finally, AS dimensions did not predict the presence of specific anxiety symptoms. To conclude, the predicting model of anxiety symptoms in children sets neuroticism and AS on the same level, with an unexpected influence of agreeableness on AS, raising the importance of other trait-like factors in the definition of such models. Moreover, AS should be considered as a unitary construct when predicting the presence of anxiety symptoms in children. Future interventions must consider these associations to help children detect and recognize the symptoms of their anxiety and help them to interpret them correctly. SN - 1664-1078 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31231271/Examining_the_Hierarchical_Influences_of_the_Big-Five_Dimensions_and_Anxiety_Sensitivity_on_Anxiety_Symptoms_in_Children L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.01185 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -