Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Species-specific calcification response of Caribbean corals after 2-year transplantation to a low aragonite saturation submarine spring.
Proc Biol Sci. 2019 06 26; 286(1905):20190572.PB

Abstract

Coral calcification is expected to decline as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration increases. We assessed the potential of Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Porites porites to survive and calcify under acidified conditions in a 2-year field transplant experiment around low pH, low aragonite saturation (Ωarag) submarine springs. Slow-growing S. siderea had the highest post-transplantation survival and showed increases in concentrations of Symbiodiniaceae, chlorophyll a and protein at the low Ωarag site. Nubbins of P. astreoides had 20% lower survival and higher chlorophyll a concentration at the low Ωarag site. Only 33% of P. porites nubbins survived at low Ωarag and their linear extension and calcification rates were reduced. The density of skeletons deposited after transplantation at the low Ωarag spring was 15-30% lower for all species. These results suggest that corals with slow calcification rates and high Symbiodiniaceae, chlorophyll a and protein concentrations may be less susceptible to ocean acidification, albeit with reduced skeletal density. We postulate that corals in the springs are responding to greater energy demands for overcoming larger differences in carbonate chemistry between the calcifying medium and the external environment. The differential mortality, growth rates and physiological changes may impact future coral species assemblages and the reef framework robustness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA , USA.4 Department of Earth System Science, University of California Irvine , Irvine, CA , USA.5 Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University , Norfolk, VA , USA.2 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA , USA. 3 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA , USA.6 Independent consultant , Cancun, Quintana Roo , Mexico.7 Universidad del Caribe , Cancun, Quintana Roo , Mexico.3 Institute of Marine Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz , Santa Cruz, CA , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31238847

Citation

Martinez, Ana, et al. "Species-specific Calcification Response of Caribbean Corals After 2-year Transplantation to a Low Aragonite Saturation Submarine Spring." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 286, no. 1905, 2019, p. 20190572.
Martinez A, Crook ED, Barshis DJ, et al. Species-specific calcification response of Caribbean corals after 2-year transplantation to a low aragonite saturation submarine spring. Proc Biol Sci. 2019;286(1905):20190572.
Martinez, A., Crook, E. D., Barshis, D. J., Potts, D. C., Rebolledo-Vieyra, M., Hernandez, L., & Paytan, A. (2019). Species-specific calcification response of Caribbean corals after 2-year transplantation to a low aragonite saturation submarine spring. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 286(1905), 20190572. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2019.0572
Martinez A, et al. Species-specific Calcification Response of Caribbean Corals After 2-year Transplantation to a Low Aragonite Saturation Submarine Spring. Proc Biol Sci. 2019 06 26;286(1905):20190572. PubMed PMID: 31238847.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Species-specific calcification response of Caribbean corals after 2-year transplantation to a low aragonite saturation submarine spring. AU - Martinez,Ana, AU - Crook,Elizabeth D, AU - Barshis,Daniel J, AU - Potts,Donald C, AU - Rebolledo-Vieyra,Mario, AU - Hernandez,Laura, AU - Paytan,Adina, Y1 - 2019/06/26/ PY - 2019/6/27/entrez PY - 2019/6/27/pubmed PY - 2020/5/19/medline KW - acclimatization KW - calcification KW - coral KW - ocean acidification KW - phenotypic plasticity KW - transplant experiment SP - 20190572 EP - 20190572 JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc. Biol. Sci. VL - 286 IS - 1905 N2 - Coral calcification is expected to decline as atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration increases. We assessed the potential of Porites astreoides, Siderastrea siderea and Porites porites to survive and calcify under acidified conditions in a 2-year field transplant experiment around low pH, low aragonite saturation (Ωarag) submarine springs. Slow-growing S. siderea had the highest post-transplantation survival and showed increases in concentrations of Symbiodiniaceae, chlorophyll a and protein at the low Ωarag site. Nubbins of P. astreoides had 20% lower survival and higher chlorophyll a concentration at the low Ωarag site. Only 33% of P. porites nubbins survived at low Ωarag and their linear extension and calcification rates were reduced. The density of skeletons deposited after transplantation at the low Ωarag spring was 15-30% lower for all species. These results suggest that corals with slow calcification rates and high Symbiodiniaceae, chlorophyll a and protein concentrations may be less susceptible to ocean acidification, albeit with reduced skeletal density. We postulate that corals in the springs are responding to greater energy demands for overcoming larger differences in carbonate chemistry between the calcifying medium and the external environment. The differential mortality, growth rates and physiological changes may impact future coral species assemblages and the reef framework robustness. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31238847/Species_specific_calcification_response_of_Caribbean_corals_after_2_year_transplantation_to_a_low_aragonite_saturation_submarine_spring_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2019.0572?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -