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Inflammatory patterns of antrochoanal polyps in the pediatric age group.

Abstract

Background

The pathogenesis and etiology of antrochoanal polyps (ACPs) remains obscure. This study aimed to characterize the inflammatory profiles and investigate the effect of atopy on the pathogenesis of pediatric ACPs.

Methods

Thirty-three ACP patients and ten control subjects were enrolled from January to December 2017. The severity of individual nasal symptoms was scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and cytokines level was measured by multiplexed luminex assay.

Results

There was no significant difference in VAS scores and counts of inflammatory cells between atopic and nonatopic ACP. No difference in IFNγ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17A and IL-25 was found between control and whole ACP, nonatopic and atopic ACP. Significantly increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10 were found in ACP compared with control. For neutrophil chemotactic factor, significant increases of IL-8 and GRO were observed in ACP, but for eosinophil chemotactic factor, no difference was found in RANTES and GM-CSF. IL-6 level was positively correlated with IL-8, MCP1, and GRO level, and IL-10 level was positively correlated with IL-4 and IL-13 in ACP subjects.

Conclusion

Nasal obstruction was the most common symptom in ACPs in children. Allergic condition may have a poor role in the pathogenesis of ACPs. IL-6 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neutrophilic inflammation in patients with ACPs and may provide a new treatment strategy for ACPs in children. Treg cell associated cytokine IL-10 was involved in the inflammatory pathophysiological process of ACPs and played a certain regulatory role.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China.2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China.1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China.2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China.1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China. 2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.1Beijing Key Laboratory for Pediatric Diseases of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, MOE Key Laboratory of Major Diseases in Children, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Center for Children's Health, Beijing, China. 2Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31249603

Citation

Zheng, Huiwen, et al. "Inflammatory Patterns of Antrochoanal Polyps in the Pediatric Age Group." Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology : Official Journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 15, 2019, p. 39.
Zheng H, Tang L, Song B, et al. Inflammatory patterns of antrochoanal polyps in the pediatric age group. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol. 2019;15:39.
Zheng, H., Tang, L., Song, B., Yang, X., Chu, P., Han, S., ... Ni, X. (2019). Inflammatory patterns of antrochoanal polyps in the pediatric age group. Allergy, Asthma, and Clinical Immunology : Official Journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 15, p. 39. doi:10.1186/s13223-019-0352-3.
Zheng H, et al. Inflammatory Patterns of Antrochoanal Polyps in the Pediatric Age Group. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol. 2019;15:39. PubMed PMID: 31249603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inflammatory patterns of antrochoanal polyps in the pediatric age group. AU - Zheng,Huiwen, AU - Tang,Lixing, AU - Song,Beibei, AU - Yang,Xiaojian, AU - Chu,Ping, AU - Han,Shujing, AU - Wang,Pengpeng, AU - Lu,Jie, AU - Ge,Wentong, AU - Ni,Xin, Y1 - 2019/06/20/ PY - 2018/11/28/received PY - 2019/06/13/accepted PY - 2019/6/29/entrez PY - 2019/6/30/pubmed PY - 2019/6/30/medline KW - Antrochoanal polyps KW - Atopy KW - Cytokine SP - 39 EP - 39 JF - Allergy, asthma, and clinical immunology : official journal of the Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol VL - 15 N2 - Background: The pathogenesis and etiology of antrochoanal polyps (ACPs) remains obscure. This study aimed to characterize the inflammatory profiles and investigate the effect of atopy on the pathogenesis of pediatric ACPs. Methods: Thirty-three ACP patients and ten control subjects were enrolled from January to December 2017. The severity of individual nasal symptoms was scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The serum total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and cytokines level was measured by multiplexed luminex assay. Results: There was no significant difference in VAS scores and counts of inflammatory cells between atopic and nonatopic ACP. No difference in IFNγ, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-17A and IL-25 was found between control and whole ACP, nonatopic and atopic ACP. Significantly increased levels of IL-6 and IL-10 were found in ACP compared with control. For neutrophil chemotactic factor, significant increases of IL-8 and GRO were observed in ACP, but for eosinophil chemotactic factor, no difference was found in RANTES and GM-CSF. IL-6 level was positively correlated with IL-8, MCP1, and GRO level, and IL-10 level was positively correlated with IL-4 and IL-13 in ACP subjects. Conclusion: Nasal obstruction was the most common symptom in ACPs in children. Allergic condition may have a poor role in the pathogenesis of ACPs. IL-6 plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of neutrophilic inflammation in patients with ACPs and may provide a new treatment strategy for ACPs in children. Treg cell associated cytokine IL-10 was involved in the inflammatory pathophysiological process of ACPs and played a certain regulatory role. SN - 1710-1484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31249603/Inflammatory_patterns_of_antrochoanal_polyps_in_the_pediatric_age_group L2 - https://aacijournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13223-019-0352-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -