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Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living with HIV in Louisiana.
AIDS Behav 2019; 23(11):2980-2991AB

Abstract

Durable viral suppression (DVS) is needed to reduce HIV transmission risk and prevent new HIV infections. We examined changes in viral suppression and correlates of DVS among 97 criminal justice-involved (CJI) Black men living with HIV in Louisiana enrolled in a linkage, re-engagement, and retention in care intervention. Most participants (75%) were Black men who have sex with men. Forty-four percent (44%) were virally suppressed at baseline and only 20% had achieved DVS over a 12-month period. Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that compared with DVS participants, those with no viral suppression (NVS) and some viral suppression (SVS) were more likely to have lived with HIV for a longer period of time and were less likely to be adherent at baseline. Medication adherence was critical for DVS among this sample of CJI Black men living with HIV who represent a high priority population for HIV care and treatment interventions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. rbrewer@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu. Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, Chicago, IL, USA. rbrewer@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu.Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, Chicago, IL, USA.Dillard University, New Orleans, LA, USA.Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, LA, USA.Educational Commission for Foreign Graduates (ECFG), Philadelphia, PA, USA.Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, Chicago, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31250229

Citation

Brewer, Russell, et al. "Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living With HIV in Louisiana." AIDS and Behavior, vol. 23, no. 11, 2019, pp. 2980-2991.
Brewer R, Issema R, Moore M, et al. Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living with HIV in Louisiana. AIDS Behav. 2019;23(11):2980-2991.
Brewer, R., Issema, R., Moore, M., Chrestman, S., Mukherjee, S., Odlum, M., & Schneider, J. A. (2019). Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living with HIV in Louisiana. AIDS and Behavior, 23(11), pp. 2980-2991. doi:10.1007/s10461-019-02578-6.
Brewer R, et al. Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living With HIV in Louisiana. AIDS Behav. 2019;23(11):2980-2991. PubMed PMID: 31250229.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlates of Durable Viral Suppression (DVS) Among Criminal Justice-involved (CJI) Black Men Living with HIV in Louisiana. AU - Brewer,Russell, AU - Issema,Rodal, AU - Moore,Mary, AU - Chrestman,Sarah, AU - Mukherjee,Snigdha, AU - Odlum,Michelle, AU - Schneider,John A, PY - 2019/6/30/pubmed PY - 2019/12/20/medline PY - 2019/6/29/entrez KW - Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) KW - Criminal justice-involved KW - Durable viral suppression KW - HIV KW - South SP - 2980 EP - 2991 JF - AIDS and behavior JO - AIDS Behav VL - 23 IS - 11 N2 - Durable viral suppression (DVS) is needed to reduce HIV transmission risk and prevent new HIV infections. We examined changes in viral suppression and correlates of DVS among 97 criminal justice-involved (CJI) Black men living with HIV in Louisiana enrolled in a linkage, re-engagement, and retention in care intervention. Most participants (75%) were Black men who have sex with men. Forty-four percent (44%) were virally suppressed at baseline and only 20% had achieved DVS over a 12-month period. Multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that compared with DVS participants, those with no viral suppression (NVS) and some viral suppression (SVS) were more likely to have lived with HIV for a longer period of time and were less likely to be adherent at baseline. Medication adherence was critical for DVS among this sample of CJI Black men living with HIV who represent a high priority population for HIV care and treatment interventions. SN - 1573-3254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31250229/Correlates_of_Durable_Viral_Suppression__DVS__Among_Criminal_Justice_involved__CJI__Black_Men_Living_with_HIV_in_Louisiana_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10461-019-02578-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -