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Early evidence of molariform hypsodonty in a Triassic stem-mammal.
Nat Commun. 2019 06 28; 10(1):2841.NC

Abstract

Hypsodonty, the occurrence of high-crowned teeth, is widespread among mammals with diets rich in abrasive material, such as plants or soil, because it increases the durability of dentitions against wear. Hypsodont postcanine teeth evolved independently in multiple mammalian lineages and in the closely related mammaliaforms since the Jurassic period. Here, we report the oldest record, to our knowledge, of hypsodont postcanines in the non-mammaliaform stem-mammal, Menadon besairiei, from the early Late Triassic. The postcanines are long and columnar, with open roots. They were not replaced in older individuals and remained functional after the total wear of the crown enamel. Dental histology suggests that, convergently to hypsodont mammals, wear was compensated by the prolonged growth of each postcanine, resulting in dentine hypsodont teeth most similar to extant xenarthran mammals. These findings highlight the constraints imposed by limited tooth replacement and tooth wear in the evolutionary trajectories of herbivorous mammals and stem-mammals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Geociências, Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, 91501-970, Bairro Agronomia, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. tomaz.melo@gmail.com.Museu de Ciências Naturais, Fundação Zoobotânica do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Dr Salvador França, 1427, 90690-000, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.CONICET- Sección Paleontología de Vertebrados, Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales "Bernardino Rivadavia", Ave. Ángel Gallardo 470, C1405DJR CABA, Buenos Aires, Argentina.Departamento de Paleontologia e Estratigrafia, Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, 91501-970, Bairro Agronomia, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31253810

Citation

Melo, Tomaz P., et al. "Early Evidence of Molariform Hypsodonty in a Triassic Stem-mammal." Nature Communications, vol. 10, no. 1, 2019, p. 2841.
Melo TP, Ribeiro AM, Martinelli AG, et al. Early evidence of molariform hypsodonty in a Triassic stem-mammal. Nat Commun. 2019;10(1):2841.
Melo, T. P., Ribeiro, A. M., Martinelli, A. G., & Soares, M. B. (2019). Early evidence of molariform hypsodonty in a Triassic stem-mammal. Nature Communications, 10(1), 2841. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10719-7
Melo TP, et al. Early Evidence of Molariform Hypsodonty in a Triassic Stem-mammal. Nat Commun. 2019 06 28;10(1):2841. PubMed PMID: 31253810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early evidence of molariform hypsodonty in a Triassic stem-mammal. AU - Melo,Tomaz P, AU - Ribeiro,Ana Maria, AU - Martinelli,Agustín G, AU - Soares,Marina Bento, Y1 - 2019/06/28/ PY - 2018/12/21/received PY - 2019/05/22/accepted PY - 2019/6/30/entrez PY - 2019/6/30/pubmed PY - 2019/8/20/medline SP - 2841 EP - 2841 JF - Nature communications JO - Nat Commun VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Hypsodonty, the occurrence of high-crowned teeth, is widespread among mammals with diets rich in abrasive material, such as plants or soil, because it increases the durability of dentitions against wear. Hypsodont postcanine teeth evolved independently in multiple mammalian lineages and in the closely related mammaliaforms since the Jurassic period. Here, we report the oldest record, to our knowledge, of hypsodont postcanines in the non-mammaliaform stem-mammal, Menadon besairiei, from the early Late Triassic. The postcanines are long and columnar, with open roots. They were not replaced in older individuals and remained functional after the total wear of the crown enamel. Dental histology suggests that, convergently to hypsodont mammals, wear was compensated by the prolonged growth of each postcanine, resulting in dentine hypsodont teeth most similar to extant xenarthran mammals. These findings highlight the constraints imposed by limited tooth replacement and tooth wear in the evolutionary trajectories of herbivorous mammals and stem-mammals. SN - 2041-1723 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31253810/Early_evidence_of_molariform_hypsodonty_in_a_Triassic_stem_mammal_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-10719-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -