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Associations between Snacking and Weight Status among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States.
Nutrients. 2019 Jun 29; 11(7)N

Abstract

Snacking is a significant contributor to energy intake among adolescents, but its association with weight status is unclear. To elucidate this association, data from 6545 adolescents (12-19 years) in the 2005-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. The mean number of daily snack occasions, mean snack size, and mean snack energy density were examined by weight classification (body mass index (BMI)-for-age percentiles: normal weight (NW) <85th; overweight (OW) ≥85th to <95th; obese (OB) ≥95th). Models included all snacking parameters, mean meal size, demographic characteristics, survey cycle year, and dietary reporting accuracy. Adolescents with NW consumed fewer snacks daily (1.69 (0.02) snacks/day) and smaller snacks per occasion (262.32 (4.41) calories (kcal)/snack) compared to adolescents with OW (1.85 (0.05) snacks/day, p = 0.005; 305.41 (8.84) kcal/snack, p < 0.001), and OB (1.97 (0.05) snacks/day; 339.60 (10.12) kcal/snack, both p < 0.001). Adolescents with OW and OB also consumed more added sugar, saturated fat and sodium from snacks, but had lower mean energy density per snack compared to snacks consumed by NW adolescents. US adolescents with OW and OB consume more snacks daily and more calories at each snacking occasion compared to adolescents with NW. Future studies should examine the prospective associations between snacking and weight status and impact on overall diet quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA. gina.tripicchio@temple.edu.Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.Behavioral Health and Nutrition, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716, USA.Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.Center for Obesity Research and Education, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31261906

Citation

Tripicchio, Gina L., et al. "Associations Between Snacking and Weight Status Among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 7, 2019.
Tripicchio GL, Kachurak A, Davey A, et al. Associations between Snacking and Weight Status among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States. Nutrients. 2019;11(7).
Tripicchio, G. L., Kachurak, A., Davey, A., Bailey, R. L., Dabritz, L. J., & Fisher, J. O. (2019). Associations between Snacking and Weight Status among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States. Nutrients, 11(7). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071486
Tripicchio GL, et al. Associations Between Snacking and Weight Status Among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States. Nutrients. 2019 Jun 29;11(7) PubMed PMID: 31261906.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between Snacking and Weight Status among Adolescents 12-19 Years in the United States. AU - Tripicchio,Gina L, AU - Kachurak,Alexandria, AU - Davey,Adam, AU - Bailey,Regan L, AU - Dabritz,Lauren J, AU - Fisher,Jennifer O, Y1 - 2019/06/29/ PY - 2019/05/24/received PY - 2019/06/14/revised PY - 2019/06/25/accepted PY - 2019/7/3/entrez PY - 2019/7/3/pubmed PY - 2020/1/8/medline KW - adolescents KW - behavioral health KW - energy-dense KW - nutrient poor foods and beverages KW - obesity KW - snacking JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 7 N2 - Snacking is a significant contributor to energy intake among adolescents, but its association with weight status is unclear. To elucidate this association, data from 6545 adolescents (12-19 years) in the 2005-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. The mean number of daily snack occasions, mean snack size, and mean snack energy density were examined by weight classification (body mass index (BMI)-for-age percentiles: normal weight (NW) <85th; overweight (OW) ≥85th to <95th; obese (OB) ≥95th). Models included all snacking parameters, mean meal size, demographic characteristics, survey cycle year, and dietary reporting accuracy. Adolescents with NW consumed fewer snacks daily (1.69 (0.02) snacks/day) and smaller snacks per occasion (262.32 (4.41) calories (kcal)/snack) compared to adolescents with OW (1.85 (0.05) snacks/day, p = 0.005; 305.41 (8.84) kcal/snack, p < 0.001), and OB (1.97 (0.05) snacks/day; 339.60 (10.12) kcal/snack, both p < 0.001). Adolescents with OW and OB also consumed more added sugar, saturated fat and sodium from snacks, but had lower mean energy density per snack compared to snacks consumed by NW adolescents. US adolescents with OW and OB consume more snacks daily and more calories at each snacking occasion compared to adolescents with NW. Future studies should examine the prospective associations between snacking and weight status and impact on overall diet quality. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31261906/Associations_between_Snacking_and_Weight_Status_among_Adolescents_12_19_Years_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11071486 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -