Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prey, populations, and the pleistocene: evidence for low COI variation in a widespread North American leech.

Abstract

Placobdella rugosa has long presented challenges to leech biologists. Its extreme morphological variability and similarity to some congeneric species has confounded classification for over a century. Recent molecular analyses revealed a surprising lack of genetic variation among morphologically disparate, geographically widespread specimens of P. rugosa. Given the lack of any obvious mechanism by which this species could disperse between distant habitats, it was expected that widespread populations would be genetically isolated from each other. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between geographic distance and genetic diversity in P. rugosa using COI sequences from specimens collected across Canada and the United States. Although we find preliminary evidence for a barrier to gene flow between eastern and western collecting localities, our vastly expanded dataset largely corroborates prior studies, showing minimal phylogeographic signal among the sequences and negligible levels of genetic isolation by distance. A recent range expansion following the last ice age and/or host-mediated dispersal are discussed as potential explanations for this unexpected phylogeographic pattern.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum , Toronto , ON , Canada. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum , Toronto , ON , Canada. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum , Toronto , ON , Canada. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto , Toronto , ON , Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31271070

Citation

Mack, Joseph, et al. "Prey, Populations, and the Pleistocene: Evidence for Low COI Variation in a Widespread North American Leech." Mitochondrial DNA. Part A, DNA Mapping, Sequencing, and Analysis, vol. 30, no. 6, 2019, pp. 749-763.
Mack J, de Carle D, Kvist S. Prey, populations, and the pleistocene: evidence for low COI variation in a widespread North American leech. Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2019;30(6):749-763.
Mack, J., de Carle, D., & Kvist, S. (2019). Prey, populations, and the pleistocene: evidence for low COI variation in a widespread North American leech. Mitochondrial DNA. Part A, DNA Mapping, Sequencing, and Analysis, 30(6), pp. 749-763. doi:10.1080/24701394.2019.1634698.
Mack J, de Carle D, Kvist S. Prey, Populations, and the Pleistocene: Evidence for Low COI Variation in a Widespread North American Leech. Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal. 2019;30(6):749-763. PubMed PMID: 31271070.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prey, populations, and the pleistocene: evidence for low COI variation in a widespread North American leech. AU - Mack,Joseph, AU - de Carle,Danielle, AU - Kvist,Sebastian, Y1 - 2019/07/04/ PY - 2019/7/5/pubmed PY - 2019/7/5/medline PY - 2019/7/5/entrez KW - KW - COI variation KW - Hirudinea KW - North America KW - leech KW - phylogeography SP - 749 EP - 763 JF - Mitochondrial DNA. Part A, DNA mapping, sequencing, and analysis JO - Mitochondrial DNA A DNA Mapp Seq Anal VL - 30 IS - 6 N2 - Placobdella rugosa has long presented challenges to leech biologists. Its extreme morphological variability and similarity to some congeneric species has confounded classification for over a century. Recent molecular analyses revealed a surprising lack of genetic variation among morphologically disparate, geographically widespread specimens of P. rugosa. Given the lack of any obvious mechanism by which this species could disperse between distant habitats, it was expected that widespread populations would be genetically isolated from each other. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between geographic distance and genetic diversity in P. rugosa using COI sequences from specimens collected across Canada and the United States. Although we find preliminary evidence for a barrier to gene flow between eastern and western collecting localities, our vastly expanded dataset largely corroborates prior studies, showing minimal phylogeographic signal among the sequences and negligible levels of genetic isolation by distance. A recent range expansion following the last ice age and/or host-mediated dispersal are discussed as potential explanations for this unexpected phylogeographic pattern. SN - 2470-1408 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31271070/Prey,_populations,_and_the_pleistocene:_evidence_for_low_COI_variation_in_a_widespread_North_American_leech DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Unbound Prime app for iOS iPhone iPadUnbound PubMed app for AndroidAlso Available:
Unbound MEDLINE
Unbound PubMed app for Windows