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Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application To Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy.
Eur Urol Oncol 2019; 2(4):425-428EU

Abstract

A mobile application (app) designed on the basis of a literature review and interviews with urologic oncologists was created to help streamline robot-assisted radical prostatectomy care and in compliance with quality indicators. Use of the app was limited to English-speaking men with iPhones; 20 of 43 men approached (47%) agreed to participate. Lack of an iPhone was the most common reason for non-enrollment (52%). Preoperatively, men received daily push notifications to perform Kegel exercises and 19 men (95%) completed an Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) questionnaire using the app. After hospital discharge, men completed a postoperative pain questionnaire and received push notifications to ambulate and increase their fluid intake. After catheter removal, daily notifications to perform Kegel exercises and complete weekly EPIC-CP surveys were pushed to monitor recovery of functional outcomes. EPIC-CP and postoperative pain assessment response rates were 75% and 90%, respectively. 85% of the men complied with notifications to ambulate, hydrate, and perform Kegel exercises. The 15 men (75%) who completed the satisfaction survey found the app easy to use and understand, which suggests that mobile apps can be easily implemented perioperatively. Mobile apps have the potential to improve compliance with perioperative instructions and allow more frequent capture of patient-reported outcomes with minimal resource utilization. Patient summary: We examined the use of a mobile application designed to capture patient-reported outcomes and guide postoperative care after major urologic surgery. Mobile apps can be implemented with relative ease and high patient satisfaction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.WNResearch, Inc., San Francisco, CA, USA.Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: jch9011@med.cornell.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31277778

Citation

Belarmino, André, et al. "Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application to Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes After Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy." European Urology Oncology, vol. 2, no. 4, 2019, pp. 425-428.
Belarmino A, Walsh R, Alshak M, et al. Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application To Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Eur Urol Oncol. 2019;2(4):425-428.
Belarmino, A., Walsh, R., Alshak, M., Patel, N., Wu, R., & Hu, J. C. (2019). Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application To Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. European Urology Oncology, 2(4), pp. 425-428. doi:10.1016/j.euo.2018.08.016.
Belarmino A, et al. Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application to Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes After Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Eur Urol Oncol. 2019;2(4):425-428. PubMed PMID: 31277778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feasibility of a Mobile Health Application To Monitor Recovery and Patient-reported Outcomes after Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. AU - Belarmino,André, AU - Walsh,Ryan, AU - Alshak,Mark, AU - Patel,Neal, AU - Wu,Ray, AU - Hu,Jim C, Y1 - 2018/09/10/ PY - 2018/08/05/received PY - 2018/08/21/revised PY - 2018/08/22/accepted PY - 2019/7/7/entrez KW - Mobile health KW - Prostate cancer KW - Telehealth KW - iPhone SP - 425 EP - 428 JF - European urology oncology JO - Eur Urol Oncol VL - 2 IS - 4 N2 - A mobile application (app) designed on the basis of a literature review and interviews with urologic oncologists was created to help streamline robot-assisted radical prostatectomy care and in compliance with quality indicators. Use of the app was limited to English-speaking men with iPhones; 20 of 43 men approached (47%) agreed to participate. Lack of an iPhone was the most common reason for non-enrollment (52%). Preoperatively, men received daily push notifications to perform Kegel exercises and 19 men (95%) completed an Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite for Clinical Practice (EPIC-CP) questionnaire using the app. After hospital discharge, men completed a postoperative pain questionnaire and received push notifications to ambulate and increase their fluid intake. After catheter removal, daily notifications to perform Kegel exercises and complete weekly EPIC-CP surveys were pushed to monitor recovery of functional outcomes. EPIC-CP and postoperative pain assessment response rates were 75% and 90%, respectively. 85% of the men complied with notifications to ambulate, hydrate, and perform Kegel exercises. The 15 men (75%) who completed the satisfaction survey found the app easy to use and understand, which suggests that mobile apps can be easily implemented perioperatively. Mobile apps have the potential to improve compliance with perioperative instructions and allow more frequent capture of patient-reported outcomes with minimal resource utilization. Patient summary: We examined the use of a mobile application designed to capture patient-reported outcomes and guide postoperative care after major urologic surgery. Mobile apps can be implemented with relative ease and high patient satisfaction. SN - 2588-9311 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31277778/Feasibility_of_a_Mobile_Health_Application_To_Monitor_Recovery_and_Patient-reported_Outcomes_after_Robot-assisted_Radical_Prostatectomy L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2588-9311(18)30135-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -