Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sleep fragmentation as an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study.
Chin Med J (Engl) 2019; 132(15):1788-1795CM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sleep disorders are one of the earliest non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Sleep disorders could, therefore, have value for recognition and diagnosis in PD. However, no unified classification and diagnostic criteria exist to evaluate sleep disorders by polysomnography (PSG). Utilizing PSG to monitor sleep processes of patients with PD and analyze sleep disorder characteristics and their relationship with demographic parameters could aid in bridging this gap. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in PD using PSG.

METHODS

PSG was used to evaluate sleep disorders in 27 patients with PD and 20 healthy volunteers between August 2015 and July 2018 in Fujian Medical University Union Hospital. Total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), total wake time, and other parameters were compared between the two groups. Finally, the correlation between sleep disorders and age, disease duration, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III scores, Hoehn-Yahr stage, and levodopa dose were analyzed. The main statistical methods included Chi-square test, two independent samples t test, Fisher exact test, and Pearson correlation.

RESULTS

Sleep fragmentation in the PD group was significantly increased (74.1%) while difficulty falling asleep and early awakening were not, as compared to healthy controls. No significant differences were found in time in bed, sleep latency (SL), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) stage 1 (N1), N1%, N2, N2%, N3%, and NREM% between PD and control groups; but TST (327.96 ± 105.26 min vs. 414.67 ± 78.31 min, P = 0.003), SE (63.26% ± 14.83% vs. 76.8% ± 11.57%, P = 0.001), R N3 (20.00 [39.00] min vs. 61.50 [48.87] min, P = 0.001), NREM (262.59 ± 91.20 min vs. 337.17 ± 63.47 min, P = 0.003), rapid-eye-movement (REM) (32.50 [33.00] min vs. 85.25 [32.12] min, P < 0.001), REM% (9.56 ± 6.01 vs. 15.50 ± 4.81, P = 0.001), REM sleep latency (157.89 ± 99.04 min vs. 103.47 ± 71.70 min, P = 0.034) were significantly reduced in PD group.

CONCLUSION

This preliminary study supported that sleep fragmentation was an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in PD. Whether sleep fragmentation is a potential quantifiable marker in PD needs to be further investigated in the future study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, China.Department of Radiology, Longyan First Hospital Affiliated to Fujian Medical University, Longyan, Fujian 364000, China.Department of Neurology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, China.Department of Neurology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, China.Department of Ultrasound, Mengchao Hepatobiliary Hospital of Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350025, China.Department of Neurology, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital, Fuzhou, Fujian 350001, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31283653

Citation

Cai, Guo-En, et al. "Sleep Fragmentation as an Important Clinical Characteristic of Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: a Preliminary Study." Chinese Medical Journal, vol. 132, no. 15, 2019, pp. 1788-1795.
Cai GE, Luo S, Chen LN, et al. Sleep fragmentation as an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study. Chin Med J. 2019;132(15):1788-1795.
Cai, G. E., Luo, S., Chen, L. N., Lu, J. P., Huang, Y. J., & Ye, Q. Y. (2019). Sleep fragmentation as an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study. Chinese Medical Journal, 132(15), pp. 1788-1795. doi:10.1097/CM9.0000000000000329.
Cai GE, et al. Sleep Fragmentation as an Important Clinical Characteristic of Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease: a Preliminary Study. Chin Med J. 2019 Aug 5;132(15):1788-1795. PubMed PMID: 31283653.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep fragmentation as an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in Parkinson's disease: a preliminary study. AU - Cai,Guo-En, AU - Luo,Shan, AU - Chen,Li-Na, AU - Lu,Jian-Ping, AU - Huang,Yu-Jie, AU - Ye,Qin-Yong, PY - 2019/7/10/pubmed PY - 2019/7/10/medline PY - 2019/7/9/entrez SP - 1788 EP - 1795 JF - Chinese medical journal JO - Chin. Med. J. VL - 132 IS - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are one of the earliest non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Sleep disorders could, therefore, have value for recognition and diagnosis in PD. However, no unified classification and diagnostic criteria exist to evaluate sleep disorders by polysomnography (PSG). Utilizing PSG to monitor sleep processes of patients with PD and analyze sleep disorder characteristics and their relationship with demographic parameters could aid in bridging this gap. This preliminary study aimed to evaluate the clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in PD using PSG. METHODS: PSG was used to evaluate sleep disorders in 27 patients with PD and 20 healthy volunteers between August 2015 and July 2018 in Fujian Medical University Union Hospital. Total sleep time (TST), sleep efficiency (SE), total wake time, and other parameters were compared between the two groups. Finally, the correlation between sleep disorders and age, disease duration, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III scores, Hoehn-Yahr stage, and levodopa dose were analyzed. The main statistical methods included Chi-square test, two independent samples t test, Fisher exact test, and Pearson correlation. RESULTS: Sleep fragmentation in the PD group was significantly increased (74.1%) while difficulty falling asleep and early awakening were not, as compared to healthy controls. No significant differences were found in time in bed, sleep latency (SL), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) stage 1 (N1), N1%, N2, N2%, N3%, and NREM% between PD and control groups; but TST (327.96 ± 105.26 min vs. 414.67 ± 78.31 min, P = 0.003), SE (63.26% ± 14.83% vs. 76.8% ± 11.57%, P = 0.001), R N3 (20.00 [39.00] min vs. 61.50 [48.87] min, P = 0.001), NREM (262.59 ± 91.20 min vs. 337.17 ± 63.47 min, P = 0.003), rapid-eye-movement (REM) (32.50 [33.00] min vs. 85.25 [32.12] min, P < 0.001), REM% (9.56 ± 6.01 vs. 15.50 ± 4.81, P = 0.001), REM sleep latency (157.89 ± 99.04 min vs. 103.47 ± 71.70 min, P = 0.034) were significantly reduced in PD group. CONCLUSION: This preliminary study supported that sleep fragmentation was an important clinical characteristic of sleep disorders in PD. Whether sleep fragmentation is a potential quantifiable marker in PD needs to be further investigated in the future study. SN - 2542-5641 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31283653/Sleep_fragmentation_as_an_important_clinical_characteristic_of_sleep_disorders_in_Parkinson's_disease:_a_preliminary_study L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CM9.0000000000000329 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -