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Factors associated with the prevalence of antibodies against Theileria equi in equids of Western Pará, Brazil.

Abstract

The State of Pará has one of the largest herds of equids (horse, donkey and mule) in Brazil, most of these animals are found on cattle farms. Equine theileriosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the parasite Theileria equi and is characterized by fever, anaemia, icterus, intravascular haemolysis, haemoglobinuria, spleen and hepatomegaly, and even death. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of antibodies against T. equi in equids in the western region of the State of Pará, Brazil, and to identify potential risk factors associated with parasite infection. A cross-sectional study was conducted with cluster sampling of farm horses from 18 municipalities. In the cities visited, samples from sport and carthorses were also included. Serum was obtained to detect T. equi-specific antibodies using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) based on a crude parasite antigen. In order to identify possible risk factors of the infection which are associated with the prevalence of antibodies, a chi-squared test was carried out. Of 1,117 equids, 373 tested positive for T. equi antibodies with an overall prevalence of 33.4% (31.3%-37.0% for the 95% confidence interval). Sex, animal species and breed were found not to be associated with the presence of T. equi antibodies, whereas age, the presence of dogs or ticks were associated with seropositivity (p < 0.05). Horses with ticks were 2.4 more likely seropositive than horses without ticks. The presence of dogs in the equid habitat and the presence of ticks resulted in a higher T. equi seropositive rate probably because dogs are hosts for vector ticks of T. equi. Our study represents the first report of T. equi antibodies in equids of western Pará revealing a widespread distribution of seropositive animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, FMVZ, University of São Paulo, USP. Av. Prof. Orlando M. Paiva 87, 05508-270, São Paulo, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil. University Center of the Amazon (UNAMA), Rua Rosa Vermelha 335, 68010-200, Santarém, Brazil.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, FMVZ, University of São Paulo, USP. Av. Prof. Orlando M. Paiva 87, 05508-270, São Paulo, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil.Laboratory of Animal Health, LARSANA, Federal University of Western Pará, UFOPA, Rua Vera Paz s/n, 68040-255, Santarém, Pará, Brazil.Masters program in Medicine and Animal Welfare, Santo Amaro University, Av. Prof. Eneas de Siqueira Neto 340, 04529-300, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Animal Science, Federal Rural University of the Semiarid, UFERSA, Av. Francisco Mota s/n, 59625-900, Mossoró, Brazil.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, FMVZ, University of São Paulo, USP. Av. Prof. Orlando M. Paiva 87, 05508-270, São Paulo, Brazil. Masters program in Medicine and Animal Welfare, Santo Amaro University, Av. Prof. Eneas de Siqueira Neto 340, 04529-300, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Veterinary Pathology, São Paulo State University, UNESP, Acesso Prof. Paulo D. Castellane s/n, 14884-900, Jaboticabal, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31286674

Citation

Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad, et al. "Factors Associated With the Prevalence of Antibodies Against Theileria Equi in Equids of Western Pará, Brazil." Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 2019.
Minervino AHH, Torres AC, Moreira TR, et al. Factors associated with the prevalence of antibodies against Theileria equi in equids of Western Pará, Brazil. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2019.
Minervino, A. H. H., Torres, A. C., Moreira, T. R., Vinholte, B. P., Sampaio, B. M., Bianchi, D., ... Machado, R. Z. (2019). Factors associated with the prevalence of antibodies against Theileria equi in equids of Western Pará, Brazil. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, doi:10.1111/tbed.13268.
Minervino AHH, et al. Factors Associated With the Prevalence of Antibodies Against Theileria Equi in Equids of Western Pará, Brazil. Transbound Emerg Dis. 2019 Jul 8; PubMed PMID: 31286674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors associated with the prevalence of antibodies against Theileria equi in equids of Western Pará, Brazil. AU - Minervino,Antonio Humberto Hamad, AU - Torres,Allana Cavalcante, AU - Moreira,Thiago Rocha, AU - Vinholte,Brena Peleja, AU - Sampaio,Bruna Matarucco, AU - Bianchi,Daniela, AU - Portela,Juliana Machado, AU - Sarturi,Cristiane, AU - Marcili,Arlei, AU - Barrêto Júnior,Raimundo Alvês, AU - Gennari,Solange Maria, AU - Machado,Rosangela Zacarias, Y1 - 2019/07/08/ PY - 2018/11/20/received PY - 2019/06/05/revised PY - 2019/06/09/accepted PY - 2019/7/10/entrez KW - ELISA KW - carthorse KW - piroplasmosis KW - sport horse KW - survey JF - Transboundary and emerging diseases JO - Transbound Emerg Dis N2 - The State of Pará has one of the largest herds of equids (horse, donkey and mule) in Brazil, most of these animals are found on cattle farms. Equine theileriosis is a tick-borne disease caused by the parasite Theileria equi and is characterized by fever, anaemia, icterus, intravascular haemolysis, haemoglobinuria, spleen and hepatomegaly, and even death. The present study aimed to determine the prevalence of antibodies against T. equi in equids in the western region of the State of Pará, Brazil, and to identify potential risk factors associated with parasite infection. A cross-sectional study was conducted with cluster sampling of farm horses from 18 municipalities. In the cities visited, samples from sport and carthorses were also included. Serum was obtained to detect T. equi-specific antibodies using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) based on a crude parasite antigen. In order to identify possible risk factors of the infection which are associated with the prevalence of antibodies, a chi-squared test was carried out. Of 1,117 equids, 373 tested positive for T. equi antibodies with an overall prevalence of 33.4% (31.3%-37.0% for the 95% confidence interval). Sex, animal species and breed were found not to be associated with the presence of T. equi antibodies, whereas age, the presence of dogs or ticks were associated with seropositivity (p < 0.05). Horses with ticks were 2.4 more likely seropositive than horses without ticks. The presence of dogs in the equid habitat and the presence of ticks resulted in a higher T. equi seropositive rate probably because dogs are hosts for vector ticks of T. equi. Our study represents the first report of T. equi antibodies in equids of western Pará revealing a widespread distribution of seropositive animals. SN - 1865-1682 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31286674/Factors_associated_with_the_prevalence_of_antibodies_against_Theileria_equi_in_equids_of_Western_Pará,_Brazil L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/tbed.13268 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -