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High-Resolution In Vivo Fundus Angiography using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System.
Transl Vis Sci Technol 2019; 8(3):54TV

Abstract

Purpose

We provide a proof of concept for the detailed characterization of retinal capillary features and surrounding photoreceptor mosaic using a customized nonadaptive optics angiography imaging system.

Methods

High-resolution fluorescein angiography (FFA) and/or indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) images were obtained using a modified Heidelberg retina angiograph (HRA2) device with a reduced scan angle enabling 3° field of view. Colocalized images of the photoreceptor mosaic also were captured in vivo using the same instrument. Visibility of vascular subbranches were compared between high-resolution images and conventional fundus angiography (FA) with a 30° field of view.

Results

High-resolution angiographic and infrared images (3° × 3° field of view, a 10-fold magnification) were obtained in 10 participants. These included seven patients with various retinal diseases, including myopic degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, macular telangiectasia, and central serous chorioretinopathy, as well as three healthy controls. Images of the retinal vasculature down to the capillary level were obtained on angiography with the ability to visualize a mean 1.2 levels more subbranches compared to conventional FA. In addition, imaging of the photoreceptor cone mosaic, to a sufficient resolution to calculate cone density, was possible. Movement of blood cells within the vasculature also was discernible on infrared videography.

Conclusions

This exploratory study demonstrates that fast high-resolution angiography and cone visualization is feasible using a commercially available imaging system.

Translational Relevance

This offers potential to better understand the relationship between the retinal neurovascular system in health and disease and the timing of therapeutic interventions in disease states.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK. Optometry and Vision Sciences Research Group, School of Biomedical Science, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. OCTlab, Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. Institute of Molecular and Clinical Ophthalmology Basel (IOB), Basel, Switzerland. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK. Optometry and Vision Sciences Research Group, School of Biomedical Science, Ulster University, Coleraine, Northern Ireland.Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31293809

Citation

Okada, Mali, et al. "High-Resolution in Vivo Fundus Angiography Using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System." Translational Vision Science & Technology, vol. 8, no. 3, 2019, p. 54.
Okada M, Heeren TFC, Mulholland PJ, et al. High-Resolution In Vivo Fundus Angiography using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System. Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2019;8(3):54.
Okada, M., Heeren, T. F. C., Mulholland, P. J., Maloca, P. M., Cilkova, M., Rocco, V., ... Tufail, A. (2019). High-Resolution In Vivo Fundus Angiography using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System. Translational Vision Science & Technology, 8(3), p. 54. doi:10.1167/tvst.8.3.54.
Okada M, et al. High-Resolution in Vivo Fundus Angiography Using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System. Transl Vis Sci Technol. 2019;8(3):54. PubMed PMID: 31293809.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High-Resolution In Vivo Fundus Angiography using a Nonadaptive Optics Imaging System. AU - Okada,Mali, AU - Heeren,Tjebo F C, AU - Mulholland,Pádraig J, AU - Maloca,Peter M, AU - Cilkova,Marketa, AU - Rocco,Vincent, AU - Fruttiger,Marcus, AU - Egan,Catherine A, AU - Anderson,Roger S, AU - Tufail,Adnan, Y1 - 2019/06/27/ PY - 2018/12/28/received PY - 2019/03/01/accepted PY - 2019/7/12/entrez PY - 2019/7/12/pubmed PY - 2019/7/12/medline KW - fluorescein angiography KW - fundus angiography KW - high-resolution KW - retinal imaging SP - 54 EP - 54 JF - Translational vision science & technology JO - Transl Vis Sci Technol VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - Purpose: We provide a proof of concept for the detailed characterization of retinal capillary features and surrounding photoreceptor mosaic using a customized nonadaptive optics angiography imaging system. Methods: High-resolution fluorescein angiography (FFA) and/or indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) images were obtained using a modified Heidelberg retina angiograph (HRA2) device with a reduced scan angle enabling 3° field of view. Colocalized images of the photoreceptor mosaic also were captured in vivo using the same instrument. Visibility of vascular subbranches were compared between high-resolution images and conventional fundus angiography (FA) with a 30° field of view. Results: High-resolution angiographic and infrared images (3° × 3° field of view, a 10-fold magnification) were obtained in 10 participants. These included seven patients with various retinal diseases, including myopic degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, macular telangiectasia, and central serous chorioretinopathy, as well as three healthy controls. Images of the retinal vasculature down to the capillary level were obtained on angiography with the ability to visualize a mean 1.2 levels more subbranches compared to conventional FA. In addition, imaging of the photoreceptor cone mosaic, to a sufficient resolution to calculate cone density, was possible. Movement of blood cells within the vasculature also was discernible on infrared videography. Conclusions: This exploratory study demonstrates that fast high-resolution angiography and cone visualization is feasible using a commercially available imaging system. Translational Relevance: This offers potential to better understand the relationship between the retinal neurovascular system in health and disease and the timing of therapeutic interventions in disease states. SN - 2164-2591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31293809/High-Resolution_In_Vivo_Fundus_Angiography_using_a_Nonadaptive_Optics_Imaging_System L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31293809/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -