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A sparse covarying unit that describes healthy and impaired human gut microbiota development.
Science 2019; 365(6449)Sci

Abstract

Characterizing the organization of the human gut microbiota is a formidable challenge given the number of possible interactions between its components. Using a statistical approach initially applied to financial markets, we measured temporally conserved covariance among bacterial taxa in the microbiota of healthy members of a Bangladeshi birth cohort sampled from 1 to 60 months of age. The results revealed an "ecogroup" of 15 covarying bacterial taxa that provide a concise description of microbiota development in healthy children from this and other low-income countries, and a means for monitoring community repair in undernourished children treated with therapeutic foods. Features of ecogroup population dynamics were recapitulated in gnotobiotic piglets as they transitioned from exclusive milk feeding to a fully weaned state consuming a representative Bangladeshi diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Faridabad, Haryana, India.HIV/AIDS and Global Health Research Programme, Department of Microbiology, University of Venda, Thohoyandou 0950, South Africa.Center for Global Health, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Clinical Research Unit and Institute of Biomedicine, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza, CE 60430270, Brazil.Department of International Health, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. AB PRISMA, Ramirez Hurtado 622, Iquitos, Peru.Departments of Medicine, Microbiology, and Pathology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia. Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia. Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.A. A. Kharkevich Institute for Information Transmission Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 127994, Russia. Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.Infectious and Inflammatory Disease Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, Dhaka 1212, Bangladesh.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA. jgordon@wustl.edu. Center for Gut Microbiome and Nutrition Research, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31296739

Citation

Raman, Arjun S., et al. "A Sparse Covarying Unit That Describes Healthy and Impaired Human Gut Microbiota Development." Science (New York, N.Y.), vol. 365, no. 6449, 2019.
Raman AS, Gehrig JL, Venkatesh S, et al. A sparse covarying unit that describes healthy and impaired human gut microbiota development. Science. 2019;365(6449).
Raman, A. S., Gehrig, J. L., Venkatesh, S., Chang, H. W., Hibberd, M. C., Subramanian, S., ... Gordon, J. I. (2019). A sparse covarying unit that describes healthy and impaired human gut microbiota development. Science (New York, N.Y.), 365(6449), doi:10.1126/science.aau4735.
Raman AS, et al. A Sparse Covarying Unit That Describes Healthy and Impaired Human Gut Microbiota Development. Science. 2019 07 12;365(6449) PubMed PMID: 31296739.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A sparse covarying unit that describes healthy and impaired human gut microbiota development. AU - Raman,Arjun S, AU - Gehrig,Jeanette L, AU - Venkatesh,Siddarth, AU - Chang,Hao-Wei, AU - Hibberd,Matthew C, AU - Subramanian,Sathish, AU - Kang,Gagandeep, AU - Bessong,Pascal O, AU - Lima,Aldo A M, AU - Kosek,Margaret N, AU - Petri,William A,Jr AU - Rodionov,Dmitry A, AU - Arzamasov,Aleksandr A, AU - Leyn,Semen A, AU - Osterman,Andrei L, AU - Huq,Sayeeda, AU - Mostafa,Ishita, AU - Islam,Munirul, AU - Mahfuz,Mustafa, AU - Haque,Rashidul, AU - Ahmed,Tahmeed, AU - Barratt,Michael J, AU - Gordon,Jeffrey I, PY - 2018/06/13/received PY - 2019/04/24/revised PY - 2019/06/07/accepted PY - 2019/7/13/entrez PY - 2019/7/13/pubmed PY - 2019/7/13/medline JF - Science (New York, N.Y.) JO - Science VL - 365 IS - 6449 N2 - Characterizing the organization of the human gut microbiota is a formidable challenge given the number of possible interactions between its components. Using a statistical approach initially applied to financial markets, we measured temporally conserved covariance among bacterial taxa in the microbiota of healthy members of a Bangladeshi birth cohort sampled from 1 to 60 months of age. The results revealed an "ecogroup" of 15 covarying bacterial taxa that provide a concise description of microbiota development in healthy children from this and other low-income countries, and a means for monitoring community repair in undernourished children treated with therapeutic foods. Features of ecogroup population dynamics were recapitulated in gnotobiotic piglets as they transitioned from exclusive milk feeding to a fully weaned state consuming a representative Bangladeshi diet. SN - 1095-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31296739/A_sparse_covarying_unit_that_describes_healthy_and_impaired_human_gut_microbiota_development_ L2 - http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=31296739 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -