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Paragonimiasis.
Adv Exp Med Biol 2019; 1154:105-138AE

Abstract

Paragonimiasis is a zoonotic disease caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. Humans usually become infected by eating freshwater crabs or crayfish containing encysted metacercariae of these worms. However, an alternative route of infection exists: ingestion of raw meat from a mammalian paratenic host. Adult worms normally occur in pairs in cysts in the lungs from which they void their eggs via air passages. The pulmonary form is typical in cases of human infection due to P. westermani, P. heterotremus, and a few other species (Table 5.1). Worms may occupy other sites in the body, notably the brain, but lung flukes have made their presence felt in almost every organ. Ectopic paragonimiasis is particularly common when infection is due to members of the P. skrjabini complex (Table 5.1). Human paragonimiasis occurs primarily in the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Africa, and the Americas, with different species being responsible in different areas (Table 5.1).

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Science and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD, Australia. davidblair49@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31297761

Citation

Blair, David. "Paragonimiasis." Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1154, 2019, pp. 105-138.
Blair D. Paragonimiasis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019;1154:105-138.
Blair, D. (2019). Paragonimiasis. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, 1154, pp. 105-138. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-18616-6_5.
Blair D. Paragonimiasis. Adv Exp Med Biol. 2019;1154:105-138. PubMed PMID: 31297761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paragonimiasis. A1 - Blair,David, PY - 2019/7/13/entrez PY - 2019/7/13/pubmed PY - 2019/9/5/medline SP - 105 EP - 138 JF - Advances in experimental medicine and biology JO - Adv. Exp. Med. Biol. VL - 1154 N2 - Paragonimiasis is a zoonotic disease caused by lung flukes of the genus Paragonimus. Humans usually become infected by eating freshwater crabs or crayfish containing encysted metacercariae of these worms. However, an alternative route of infection exists: ingestion of raw meat from a mammalian paratenic host. Adult worms normally occur in pairs in cysts in the lungs from which they void their eggs via air passages. The pulmonary form is typical in cases of human infection due to P. westermani, P. heterotremus, and a few other species (Table 5.1). Worms may occupy other sites in the body, notably the brain, but lung flukes have made their presence felt in almost every organ. Ectopic paragonimiasis is particularly common when infection is due to members of the P. skrjabini complex (Table 5.1). Human paragonimiasis occurs primarily in the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Africa, and the Americas, with different species being responsible in different areas (Table 5.1). SN - 0065-2598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31297761/Paragonimiasis DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -