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Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity.
Cell Reprogram 2019; 21(4):187-199CR

Abstract

Stromal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capability to self-renew and can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesoderm germ layer, but their properties are affected by molecular aging mechanisms. MSCs can be obtained from adipose tissue termed as adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) representing a promising tool for studying age-related diseases in detail. ASCs from young (16 weeks) and old (>108 weeks) rabbits were successfully isolated and propagated. ASCs showed the typical morphology and stained positive for CD105, Vimentin, Collagenase 1A, and negative for CD14, CD90, and CD73, demonstrating their mesenchymal origin. ASCs expressed MSC markers, including MYC, KLF4, CHD1, REST, and KAT6A, whereas pluripotency-related genes, such as NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2, were not expressed. Aged ASCs showed altered protein and mRNA levels of APOE, ATG7, FGF2, PTEN, and SIRT1. Adipogenic differentiation of old visceral ASCs was significantly decreased compared with young visceral ASCs. We successfully established rabbit ASC cultures representing an in vitro model for the analysis of stem cell aging mechanisms. ASCs, obtained from old female rabbits, showed age- and source-specific alteration due to aging of the donor. Stem cell plasticity was altered with age as shown by reduced adipogenic differentiation capacity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.2Center for Medical Basic Research, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.3Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.3Department of Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.1Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Psychotherapy, Psychosomatic Medicine, Martin Luther University Medical Faculty, Halle, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31298565

Citation

Jung, Juliane-Susanne, et al. "Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity." Cellular Reprogramming, vol. 21, no. 4, 2019, pp. 187-199.
Jung JS, Volk C, Marga C, et al. Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity. Cell Reprogram. 2019;21(4):187-199.
Jung, J. S., Volk, C., Marga, C., Navarrete Santos, A., Jung, M., Rujescu, D., & Navarrete Santos, A. (2019). Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity. Cellular Reprogramming, 21(4), pp. 187-199. doi:10.1089/cell.2019.0010.
Jung JS, et al. Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity. Cell Reprogram. 2019;21(4):187-199. PubMed PMID: 31298565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells Recapitulate Aging Biomarkers and Show Reduced Stem Cell Plasticity Affecting Their Adipogenic Differentiation Capacity. AU - Jung,Juliane-Susanne, AU - Volk,Christin, AU - Marga,Christina, AU - Navarrete Santos,Alexander, AU - Jung,Matthias, AU - Rujescu,Dan, AU - Navarrete Santos,Anne, Y1 - 2019/07/12/ PY - 2019/7/13/pubmed PY - 2019/7/13/medline PY - 2019/7/13/entrez KW - adipogenic differentiation KW - adipose-derived stem/stromal cells KW - aging biomarkers KW - and stem cell plasticity KW - healthy aging SP - 187 EP - 199 JF - Cellular reprogramming JO - Cell Reprogram VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - Stromal mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capability to self-renew and can differentiate into multiple cell types of the mesoderm germ layer, but their properties are affected by molecular aging mechanisms. MSCs can be obtained from adipose tissue termed as adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) representing a promising tool for studying age-related diseases in detail. ASCs from young (16 weeks) and old (>108 weeks) rabbits were successfully isolated and propagated. ASCs showed the typical morphology and stained positive for CD105, Vimentin, Collagenase 1A, and negative for CD14, CD90, and CD73, demonstrating their mesenchymal origin. ASCs expressed MSC markers, including MYC, KLF4, CHD1, REST, and KAT6A, whereas pluripotency-related genes, such as NANOG, OCT4, and SOX2, were not expressed. Aged ASCs showed altered protein and mRNA levels of APOE, ATG7, FGF2, PTEN, and SIRT1. Adipogenic differentiation of old visceral ASCs was significantly decreased compared with young visceral ASCs. We successfully established rabbit ASC cultures representing an in vitro model for the analysis of stem cell aging mechanisms. ASCs, obtained from old female rabbits, showed age- and source-specific alteration due to aging of the donor. Stem cell plasticity was altered with age as shown by reduced adipogenic differentiation capacity. SN - 2152-4998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31298565/Adipose-Derived_Stem/Stromal_Cells_Recapitulate_Aging_Biomarkers_and_Show_Reduced_Stem_Cell_Plasticity_Affecting_Their_Adipogenic_Differentiation_Capacity L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/cell.2019.0010?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -