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Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether.
Environ Sci Technol 2019; 53(15):8845-8853ES

Abstract

Alkyl vinyl ethers are widely used as fuel additives. Despite this, their atmospheric chemistry and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potentials are still not well-known under complex pollution conditions. In this work, we examined the impact of SO2, relative humidity (RH), and particle acidity on the formation and oxidation state (OSc) of SOA from butyl vinyl ether (BVE) ozonolysis. Increasing SO2 concentration produced a notable promotion of SOA formation and OSc due to the significant increase in H2SO4 particles and formation of more highly oxidized components. Increased RH in the presence of SO2 appeared to promote, suppress, and dominate the formation and OSc of SOA in the dry range (1-10%), low RH range (10-42%), and moderate RH range (42-64%), respectively. This highlights the importance of competition between H2O and SO2 in reacting with the stabilized Criegee intermediate in BVE ozonolysis at ambient RH. Increased particle acidity mainly contributed to the change in chemical composition of BVE-dominated SOA but not to SOA formation. The results presented here extend previous analysis of BVE-derived SOA and further aid our understanding of SOA formation potential of BVE ozonolysis under highly complex pollution conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Xiamen 361021 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Xiamen 361021 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Xiamen 361021 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control , Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100085 , China. Center for Excellence in Regional Atmospheric Environment, Institute of Urban Environment , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Xiamen 361021 , China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences , Beijing 100049 , China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31298843

Citation

Zhang, Peng, et al. "Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity On Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 53, no. 15, 2019, pp. 8845-8853.
Zhang P, Chen T, Liu J, et al. Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether. Environ Sci Technol. 2019;53(15):8845-8853.
Zhang, P., Chen, T., Liu, J., Liu, C., Ma, J., Ma, Q., ... He, H. (2019). Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether. Environmental Science & Technology, 53(15), pp. 8845-8853. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b02702.
Zhang P, et al. Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity On Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether. Environ Sci Technol. 2019 Aug 6;53(15):8845-8853. PubMed PMID: 31298843.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impacts of SO2, Relative Humidity, and Seed Acidity on Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Ozonolysis of Butyl Vinyl Ether. AU - Zhang,Peng, AU - Chen,Tianzeng, AU - Liu,Jun, AU - Liu,Changgeng, AU - Ma,Jinzhu, AU - Ma,Qingxin, AU - Chu,Biwu, AU - He,Hong, Y1 - 2019/07/25/ PY - 2019/7/13/pubmed PY - 2019/7/13/medline PY - 2019/7/13/entrez SP - 8845 EP - 8853 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ. Sci. Technol. VL - 53 IS - 15 N2 - Alkyl vinyl ethers are widely used as fuel additives. Despite this, their atmospheric chemistry and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation potentials are still not well-known under complex pollution conditions. In this work, we examined the impact of SO2, relative humidity (RH), and particle acidity on the formation and oxidation state (OSc) of SOA from butyl vinyl ether (BVE) ozonolysis. Increasing SO2 concentration produced a notable promotion of SOA formation and OSc due to the significant increase in H2SO4 particles and formation of more highly oxidized components. Increased RH in the presence of SO2 appeared to promote, suppress, and dominate the formation and OSc of SOA in the dry range (1-10%), low RH range (10-42%), and moderate RH range (42-64%), respectively. This highlights the importance of competition between H2O and SO2 in reacting with the stabilized Criegee intermediate in BVE ozonolysis at ambient RH. Increased particle acidity mainly contributed to the change in chemical composition of BVE-dominated SOA but not to SOA formation. The results presented here extend previous analysis of BVE-derived SOA and further aid our understanding of SOA formation potential of BVE ozonolysis under highly complex pollution conditions. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31298843/Impacts_of_SO2,_Relative_Humidity,_and_Seed_Acidity_on_Secondary_Organic_Aerosol_Formation_in_the_Ozonolysis_of_Butyl_Vinyl_Ether L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b02702 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -