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Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic.
J Am Board Fam Med. 2019 Jul-Aug; 32(4):601-606.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are a major source of calories, and are associated with adverse health outcomes. Because the majority of studies are undertaken in urban areas, the rural intake of SSB presents a significant gap in current knowledge. The objective of our study was to assess SSB intake in a rural primary care clinic.

METHODS

The Beverage Intake Questionnaire is a 15-item self-reported questionnaire and has been extensively validated to assess habitual SSB consumption. The survey was administered to adult primary care clinic patients presenting for routine care over a 6-week period at a clinic in a rural central Nebraska community (population < 1,000).

RESULTS

Survey participants (n = 121) were primarily white with an average age of 61 years (SD = 18.0) and an average body mass index (BMI) of 29.9 kg/m2 (SD = 7.5). Participants consumed an average of 1.05 SSBs per day (SD = 1.3), and 33.5% of respondents consumed one or more SSBs per day. The average daily caloric intake from SSBs was 153 Kilocalories (Kcals) compared the national average intake of 145 Kcals. The most commonly consumed caloric beverages, based on Kilocalories consumed, were 100% juice and regular soda. SSB consumption was not related to with BMI.

DISCUSSION

In a rural primary care clinic, the daily consumption of SSB by patients was found to be a noteworthy source of calories, with no significant difference in consumption across BMI categories. Mitigation of SSB consumption by rural primary care clinicians is imperative for optimizing health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, Memorial Hermann Health System, Sugar Land, TX (LP); Department of Family Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (BK, JG). lpinon17@gmail.com.From the Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, Memorial Hermann Health System, Sugar Land, TX (LP); Department of Family Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (BK, JG).From the Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program, Memorial Hermann Health System, Sugar Land, TX (LP); Department of Family Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (BK, JG).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31300581

Citation

Pinon, Laura, et al. "Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic." Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, vol. 32, no. 4, 2019, pp. 601-606.
Pinon L, Khandalavala B, Geske J. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic. J Am Board Fam Med. 2019;32(4):601-606.
Pinon, L., Khandalavala, B., & Geske, J. (2019). Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic. Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM, 32(4), 601-606. https://doi.org/10.3122/jabfm.2019.04.180170
Pinon L, Khandalavala B, Geske J. Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic. J Am Board Fam Med. 2019 Jul-Aug;32(4):601-606. PubMed PMID: 31300581.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake in a Rural Family Medicine Clinic. AU - Pinon,Laura, AU - Khandalavala,Birgit, AU - Geske,Jenenne, PY - 2018/06/12/received PY - 2019/04/01/revised PY - 2019/04/02/accepted PY - 2019/7/14/entrez PY - 2019/7/14/pubmed PY - 2020/8/18/medline KW - Beverages KW - Body Mass Index KW - Energy Intake KW - Health Behavior KW - Nebraska KW - Primary Health Care KW - Rural Population KW - Self Report KW - Sugars KW - Sweetening Agents SP - 601 EP - 606 JF - Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine : JABFM JO - J Am Board Fam Med VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) are a major source of calories, and are associated with adverse health outcomes. Because the majority of studies are undertaken in urban areas, the rural intake of SSB presents a significant gap in current knowledge. The objective of our study was to assess SSB intake in a rural primary care clinic. METHODS: The Beverage Intake Questionnaire is a 15-item self-reported questionnaire and has been extensively validated to assess habitual SSB consumption. The survey was administered to adult primary care clinic patients presenting for routine care over a 6-week period at a clinic in a rural central Nebraska community (population < 1,000). RESULTS: Survey participants (n = 121) were primarily white with an average age of 61 years (SD = 18.0) and an average body mass index (BMI) of 29.9 kg/m2 (SD = 7.5). Participants consumed an average of 1.05 SSBs per day (SD = 1.3), and 33.5% of respondents consumed one or more SSBs per day. The average daily caloric intake from SSBs was 153 Kilocalories (Kcals) compared the national average intake of 145 Kcals. The most commonly consumed caloric beverages, based on Kilocalories consumed, were 100% juice and regular soda. SSB consumption was not related to with BMI. DISCUSSION: In a rural primary care clinic, the daily consumption of SSB by patients was found to be a noteworthy source of calories, with no significant difference in consumption across BMI categories. Mitigation of SSB consumption by rural primary care clinicians is imperative for optimizing health. SN - 1558-7118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31300581/Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Intake_in_a_Rural_Family_Medicine_Clinic_ L2 - http://www.jabfm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=31300581 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -