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Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2019; 75(1):31-38.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is unclear that how prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affect pregnancy outcomes in -China. Thus, we explored how BMI, GWG, and GDM affect the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective, population-based study included all births in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. Demographic data and pregnancy outcomes of 73,498 women were acquired from the Medical Birth Registry of Xiamen. Women were categorized into groups on prepregnancy BMI and GWG in order to assess the risk of pregnancy outcomes. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate risk factors.

RESULTS

Overall, 6,982 (9.37%) women were obese, and 8,874 (12.07%) women were overweight. Obese women are more vulnerable to cesarean delivery, preterm birth, large-for-gestational age (LGA), and macrosomia (crude OR [cOR] 2.00, 1.89-2.12; 1.35, 1.20-1.51; 2.12, 1.99-2.26; 2.53, 2.25-2.86, respectively, adjusted ORs 1.73, 1.62-1.84; 1.25, 1.10-1.42; 2.03, 1.90-2.18; 2.77, 2.44-3.16, respectively). Similar results were observed in overweight women (cORs 1.49, 1.42-1.57; 1.02, 0.91-1.15; 1.60, 1.50-1.70; 2.01, 1.78-2.26, respectively). Furthermore, women who gain weight in excessive group were 1.43, 2.06, and 2.16 times to deliver cesarean, LGA, and macrosomia, respectively. Additionally, GDM women were easily subjected to cesarean section, preterm birth, LGA, low birth weight, and macrosamia (cORs 1.52, 1.55, 1.52, 1.37, 1.27, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Obesity prior to pregnancy, excessive GWG, and GDM were all associated with increased odds of cesarean, LGA, and macrosomia. Blood glucose and weight control before and during pregnancy are needed that may reduce the complications of pregnancy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Medical College of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China. Xiamen Diabetes Institute, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China. Xiamen Diabetes Institute, Xiamen, China.Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen, China, xmlixuejun@163.com. Xiamen Diabetes Institute, Xiamen, China, xmlixuejun@163.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31302647

Citation

Su, Wei-Juan, et al. "Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus On Pregnancy Outcomes: a Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 75, no. 1, 2019, pp. 31-38.
Su WJ, Chen YL, Huang PY, et al. Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. Ann Nutr Metab. 2019;75(1):31-38.
Su, W. J., Chen, Y. L., Huang, P. Y., Shi, X. L., Yan, F. F., Chen, Z., Yan, B., Song, H. Q., Lin, M. Z., & Li, X. J. (2019). Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 75(1), 31-38. https://doi.org/10.1159/000501710
Su WJ, et al. Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus On Pregnancy Outcomes: a Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. Ann Nutr Metab. 2019;75(1):31-38. PubMed PMID: 31302647.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain, and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus on Pregnancy Outcomes: A Population-Based Study in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. AU - Su,Wei-Juan, AU - Chen,Yin-Ling, AU - Huang,Pei-Ying, AU - Shi,Xiu-Lin, AU - Yan,Fang-Fang, AU - Chen,Zheng, AU - Yan,Bing, AU - Song,Hai-Qu, AU - Lin,Ming-Zhu, AU - Li,Xue-Jun, Y1 - 2019/07/12/ PY - 2019/03/08/received PY - 2019/06/24/accepted PY - 2019/7/16/pubmed PY - 2020/6/6/medline PY - 2019/7/15/entrez KW - Adjusted OR KW - Gestational diabetes mellitus KW - Pregnancy outcomes KW - Prepregnancy body mass index KW - Weight gain SP - 31 EP - 38 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann. Nutr. Metab. VL - 75 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: It is unclear that how prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain (GWG), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affect pregnancy outcomes in -China. Thus, we explored how BMI, GWG, and GDM affect the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes. METHODS: We performed a retrospective, population-based study included all births in Xiamen, China, 2011-2018. Demographic data and pregnancy outcomes of 73,498 women were acquired from the Medical Birth Registry of Xiamen. Women were categorized into groups on prepregnancy BMI and GWG in order to assess the risk of pregnancy outcomes. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to evaluate risk factors. RESULTS: Overall, 6,982 (9.37%) women were obese, and 8,874 (12.07%) women were overweight. Obese women are more vulnerable to cesarean delivery, preterm birth, large-for-gestational age (LGA), and macrosomia (crude OR [cOR] 2.00, 1.89-2.12; 1.35, 1.20-1.51; 2.12, 1.99-2.26; 2.53, 2.25-2.86, respectively, adjusted ORs 1.73, 1.62-1.84; 1.25, 1.10-1.42; 2.03, 1.90-2.18; 2.77, 2.44-3.16, respectively). Similar results were observed in overweight women (cORs 1.49, 1.42-1.57; 1.02, 0.91-1.15; 1.60, 1.50-1.70; 2.01, 1.78-2.26, respectively). Furthermore, women who gain weight in excessive group were 1.43, 2.06, and 2.16 times to deliver cesarean, LGA, and macrosomia, respectively. Additionally, GDM women were easily subjected to cesarean section, preterm birth, LGA, low birth weight, and macrosamia (cORs 1.52, 1.55, 1.52, 1.37, 1.27, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity prior to pregnancy, excessive GWG, and GDM were all associated with increased odds of cesarean, LGA, and macrosomia. Blood glucose and weight control before and during pregnancy are needed that may reduce the complications of pregnancy. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31302647/Effects_of_Prepregnancy_Body_Mass_Index_Weight_Gain_and_Gestational_Diabetes_Mellitus_on_Pregnancy_Outcomes:_A_Population_Based_Study_in_Xiamen_China_2011_2018_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000501710 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -