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Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of gallstone diasease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Medicine (Baltimore). 2019 Jul; 98(28):e16404.M

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The role of fruit and vegetables (FVs) consumption in decreasing gallstone disease risk remains contradictory. We performed a meta-analysis to analyze this potential correlation, followed by investigation of dose-response relationship of FVs consumption with gallstone disease.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

PubMed, Embase, as well as Web of Science were searched to determine all published researches about the connection of FVs consumption with gallstone disease before March 2018. Relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios (ORs) along with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was pooled utilizing random effect models, aiming at examining the correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk.

RESULTS

One cross-sectional study, our case-control studies as well as nine cohort studies were enrolled, covering approximately 33,983 patients with gallstone disease and 1,53,3752 participants. In a pooled analysis, vegetables consumption was significantly related to a decreased gallstone disease risk, (RR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.74-0.94, I = 91.1%), and for fruits consumption, RR was similar (RR = 0.88, 95%CI, 0.83-0.92, I = 0.01%). This inverse correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk was solid in most subgroup analysis. The nonlinear dose-response correlation indicated that gallstone risk was reduced by 4% (RR = 0.96, 95%CI, 0.93-0.98) and 3% (RR = 0.97, 95%CI, 0.96-0.98) for every 200 g per day increment in vegetables consumption (P = .001) and fruits consumption (P = .001), respectively.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests vegetables and fruits consumption is correlated with a significantly reduced risk of gallstone disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Liver Surgery, Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences (CAMS& PUMC), Beijing 100730, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31305451

Citation

Zhang, Jun-Wei, et al. "Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Diasease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." Medicine, vol. 98, no. 28, 2019, pp. e16404.
Zhang JW, Xiong JP, Xu WY, et al. Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of gallstone diasease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2019;98(28):e16404.
Zhang, J. W., Xiong, J. P., Xu, W. Y., Sang, X. T., Huang, H. C., Bian, J., Xu, Y. Y., Lu, X., & Zhao, H. T. (2019). Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of gallstone diasease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Medicine, 98(28), e16404. https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000016404
Zhang JW, et al. Fruits and Vegetables Consumption and the Risk of Gallstone Diasease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Medicine (Baltimore). 2019;98(28):e16404. PubMed PMID: 31305451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruits and vegetables consumption and the risk of gallstone diasease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Zhang,Jun-Wei, AU - Xiong,Jian-Ping, AU - Xu,Wei-Yu, AU - Sang,Xin-Ting, AU - Huang,Han-Chun, AU - Bian,Jin, AU - Xu,Yi-Yao, AU - Lu,Xin, AU - Zhao,Hai-Tao, PY - 2019/7/16/entrez PY - 2019/7/16/pubmed PY - 2019/7/30/medline SP - e16404 EP - e16404 JF - Medicine JO - Medicine (Baltimore) VL - 98 IS - 28 N2 - BACKGROUND: The role of fruit and vegetables (FVs) consumption in decreasing gallstone disease risk remains contradictory. We performed a meta-analysis to analyze this potential correlation, followed by investigation of dose-response relationship of FVs consumption with gallstone disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS: PubMed, Embase, as well as Web of Science were searched to determine all published researches about the connection of FVs consumption with gallstone disease before March 2018. Relative risks (RRs) or odds ratios (ORs) along with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was pooled utilizing random effect models, aiming at examining the correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk. RESULTS: One cross-sectional study, our case-control studies as well as nine cohort studies were enrolled, covering approximately 33,983 patients with gallstone disease and 1,53,3752 participants. In a pooled analysis, vegetables consumption was significantly related to a decreased gallstone disease risk, (RR = 0.83, 95% CI, 0.74-0.94, I = 91.1%), and for fruits consumption, RR was similar (RR = 0.88, 95%CI, 0.83-0.92, I = 0.01%). This inverse correlation of FVs consumption with gallstone disease risk was solid in most subgroup analysis. The nonlinear dose-response correlation indicated that gallstone risk was reduced by 4% (RR = 0.96, 95%CI, 0.93-0.98) and 3% (RR = 0.97, 95%CI, 0.96-0.98) for every 200 g per day increment in vegetables consumption (P = .001) and fruits consumption (P = .001), respectively. CONCLUSION: This study suggests vegetables and fruits consumption is correlated with a significantly reduced risk of gallstone disease. SN - 1536-5964 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31305451/Fruits_and_vegetables_consumption_and_the_risk_of_gallstone_diasease:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000016404 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -