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Contribution of brown adipose tissue to human energy metabolism.

Abstract

The present "obesogenic' environment has favored excessive energy intake resulting in the current obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. The epidemic has incentivized scientists to develop novel behavioral and pharmacological strategies that enhance energy expenditure to compensate for excessive energy intake. Although physical activity is effective to increase total energy expenditure, it is insufficient to induce negative energy balance and weight loss. With the discovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans, BAT activation soon emerged as a potential strategy for elevating energy expenditure. BAT is the only tissue that expresses uncoupling protein 1, conferring on this tissue high thermogenic capacity due to a low efficiency for mitochondrial ATP generation. Potential manipulation of BAT mass and activity has fueled the interest in altering whole-body energy balance through increased energy expenditure. Remarkable advances have been made in quantifying the amount and activity of BAT in humans. Many studies have concluded that the amount of active BAT appears insufficient to induce meaningful increases in energy expenditure. Thus, the majority of studies report that BAT activation does not influence body weight and metabolic control in humans. Strategies to increase BAT mass and/or to potentiate BAT activity seem necessary.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud. Carrera de Nutrición y Dietética. Facultad de Medicina. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile.Clinical Science. Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.Clinical Science. Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA, USA.Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud. Carrera de Nutrición y Dietética. Facultad de Medicina. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Departamento de Nutrición, Diabetes y Metabolismo. Facultad de Medicina. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: jgalgani@uc.cl.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31306668

Citation

Fernández-Verdejo, Rodrigo, et al. "Contribution of Brown Adipose Tissue to Human Energy Metabolism." Molecular Aspects of Medicine, 2019.
Fernández-Verdejo R, Marlatt KL, Ravussin E, et al. Contribution of brown adipose tissue to human energy metabolism. Mol Aspects Med. 2019.
Fernández-Verdejo, R., Marlatt, K. L., Ravussin, E., & Galgani, J. E. (2019). Contribution of brown adipose tissue to human energy metabolism. Molecular Aspects of Medicine, doi:10.1016/j.mam.2019.07.003.
Fernández-Verdejo R, et al. Contribution of Brown Adipose Tissue to Human Energy Metabolism. Mol Aspects Med. 2019 Jul 16; PubMed PMID: 31306668.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contribution of brown adipose tissue to human energy metabolism. AU - Fernández-Verdejo,Rodrigo, AU - Marlatt,Kara L, AU - Ravussin,Eric, AU - Galgani,Jose E, Y1 - 2019/07/16/ PY - 2019/03/06/received PY - 2019/07/09/revised PY - 2019/07/11/accepted PY - 2019/7/16/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline PY - 2019/7/16/entrez KW - Cold exposure KW - Glucose homeostasis KW - Lipid homeostasis KW - Obesity KW - Thermogenesis JF - Molecular aspects of medicine JO - Mol. Aspects Med. N2 - The present "obesogenic' environment has favored excessive energy intake resulting in the current obesity epidemic and its associated diseases. The epidemic has incentivized scientists to develop novel behavioral and pharmacological strategies that enhance energy expenditure to compensate for excessive energy intake. Although physical activity is effective to increase total energy expenditure, it is insufficient to induce negative energy balance and weight loss. With the discovery of brown adipose tissue (BAT) in adult humans, BAT activation soon emerged as a potential strategy for elevating energy expenditure. BAT is the only tissue that expresses uncoupling protein 1, conferring on this tissue high thermogenic capacity due to a low efficiency for mitochondrial ATP generation. Potential manipulation of BAT mass and activity has fueled the interest in altering whole-body energy balance through increased energy expenditure. Remarkable advances have been made in quantifying the amount and activity of BAT in humans. Many studies have concluded that the amount of active BAT appears insufficient to induce meaningful increases in energy expenditure. Thus, the majority of studies report that BAT activation does not influence body weight and metabolic control in humans. Strategies to increase BAT mass and/or to potentiate BAT activity seem necessary. SN - 1872-9452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31306668/Contribution_of_brown_adipose_tissue_to_human_energy_metabolism L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0098-2997(19)30029-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -