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Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis.

Abstract

Pediculosis is an infestation of lice on the body, head, and/or pubic region that occurs worldwide. Lice are ectoparasites of the order Phthiraptera that feed on the blood of infested hosts. Their morphotype dictates their clinical features. Body lice may transmit bacterial pathogens that cause trench fever, relapsing fever, and epidemic typhus, which are potentially life-threatening diseases that remain relevant in contemporary times. Recent data from some settings suggest head lice may harbor pathogens. Herein, the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and management of body, head, and pubic louse infestation are reviewed. New therapies for head lice and screening considerations for pubic lice are discussed. Tungiasis is an ectoparasitic disease caused by skin penetration by the female Tunga penetrans or, less commonly, Tunga trimamillata flea. It is endemic in Latin America, the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa and seen in travelers returning from these regions. Herein, risk factors for acquiring tungiasis, associated morbidity, and potential strategies for prevention and treatment are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, USA.Departments of Dermatology and Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA.Department of Dermatology, AP-HP, University of Paris-Est Créteil, Créteil, France.Tropical Diseases, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia; Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Department of General Medicine, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, USA. Electronic address: aileen.chang@ucsf.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31306729

Citation

Coates, Sarah J., et al. "Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis." Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 2019.
Coates SJ, Thomas C, Chosidow O, et al. Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019.
Coates, S. J., Thomas, C., Chosidow, O., Engelman, D., & Chang, A. Y. (2019). Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2019.05.110.
Coates SJ, et al. Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Jul 12; PubMed PMID: 31306729.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Part II - Ectoparasites: Pediculosis and Tungiasis. AU - Coates,Sarah J, AU - Thomas,Cristina, AU - Chosidow,Olivier, AU - Engelman,Daniel, AU - Chang,Aileen Y, Y1 - 2019/07/12/ PY - 2019/02/22/received PY - 2019/05/16/revised PY - 2019/05/31/accepted PY - 2019/7/16/entrez PY - 2019/7/16/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline KW - Pediculus capitis KW - Pediculus humanus KW - Phthirus pubis, trench fever KW - Tunga penetrans KW - Tunga trimamillata KW - body lice KW - ectoparasite KW - epidemic typhus KW - flea KW - head lice KW - homeless KW - homelessness KW - infestation KW - lice KW - pediculosis KW - poverty KW - pubic lice KW - refugee KW - relapsing fever KW - returning traveler KW - tungiasis JF - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology JO - J. Am. Acad. Dermatol. N2 - Pediculosis is an infestation of lice on the body, head, and/or pubic region that occurs worldwide. Lice are ectoparasites of the order Phthiraptera that feed on the blood of infested hosts. Their morphotype dictates their clinical features. Body lice may transmit bacterial pathogens that cause trench fever, relapsing fever, and epidemic typhus, which are potentially life-threatening diseases that remain relevant in contemporary times. Recent data from some settings suggest head lice may harbor pathogens. Herein, the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and management of body, head, and pubic louse infestation are reviewed. New therapies for head lice and screening considerations for pubic lice are discussed. Tungiasis is an ectoparasitic disease caused by skin penetration by the female Tunga penetrans or, less commonly, Tunga trimamillata flea. It is endemic in Latin America, the Caribbean and sub-Saharan Africa and seen in travelers returning from these regions. Herein, risk factors for acquiring tungiasis, associated morbidity, and potential strategies for prevention and treatment are discussed. SN - 1097-6787 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31306729/Part_II_-_Ectoparasites:_Pediculosis_and_Tungiasis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0190-9622(19)32386-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -