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Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: An Examination of Gender Differences.
J Youth Adolesc. 2020 Jan; 49(1):178-191.JY

Abstract

Coparenting relationship has been linked to the development and adaptation of adolescents. However, whether and how fathers and mothers' individual behaviors in coparenting relationships are linked to peer outcomes of boys and girls during adolescence have yet to be clarified. The present study addresses this gap in knowledge by examining the relationships among coparenting behavior, parent-adolescent attachment, and peer attachment of adolescents and the gender differences of these relationships. Families (N= 820) that included fathers, mothers, and focal adolescents (53% female, Mage = 13.70 ± 2.51) participated in this study. The fathers and mothers reported their coparenting behavior to their spouse and the adolescents completed the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment. Structure equation modeling in the total sample revealed that maternal positive and paternal negative coparenting behaviors were related to peer attachment through the indirect effects of father- and mother-adolescent attachments. Multi-group analysis revealed that father- and mother-adolescent attachments had strong predicting effects on the peer attachment of offsprings with the same sex. Maternal positive coparenting behavior was related to the peer attachment of boys and girls through the indirect effects of the father- and mother-adolescent attachments. Paternal negative coparenting behavior had a double-edged effect on girls' peer attachment and was not related to boys' peer attachment. This study extended the perspective of a family-peer system linkage by providing evidence that parents' individual behavior in the coparenting process was linked to adolescents' peer outcome. Moreover, this research suggested that encouraging mothers to enhance their positive relationship with fathers and preventing fathers from overtly pursuing conflicts and covertly disparaging mothers may be effective methods to promote adolescents' peer relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.Faculty of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China. xcwu@bnu.edu.cn.Faculty of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31309414

Citation

Zou, Shengqi, et al. "Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: an Examination of Gender Differences." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 49, no. 1, 2020, pp. 178-191.
Zou S, Wu X, Li X. Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: An Examination of Gender Differences. J Youth Adolesc. 2020;49(1):178-191.
Zou, S., Wu, X., & Li, X. (2020). Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: An Examination of Gender Differences. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 49(1), 178-191. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01068-1
Zou S, Wu X, Li X. Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: an Examination of Gender Differences. J Youth Adolesc. 2020;49(1):178-191. PubMed PMID: 31309414.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coparenting Behavior, Parent-Adolescent Attachment, and Peer Attachment: An Examination of Gender Differences. AU - Zou,Shengqi, AU - Wu,Xinchun, AU - Li,Xiaowei, Y1 - 2019/07/15/ PY - 2019/05/20/received PY - 2019/06/19/accepted PY - 2019/7/17/pubmed PY - 2020/8/18/medline PY - 2019/7/17/entrez KW - Coparenting behavior KW - Gender difference KW - Parent–adolescent attachment KW - Peer attachment SP - 178 EP - 191 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 49 IS - 1 N2 - Coparenting relationship has been linked to the development and adaptation of adolescents. However, whether and how fathers and mothers' individual behaviors in coparenting relationships are linked to peer outcomes of boys and girls during adolescence have yet to be clarified. The present study addresses this gap in knowledge by examining the relationships among coparenting behavior, parent-adolescent attachment, and peer attachment of adolescents and the gender differences of these relationships. Families (N= 820) that included fathers, mothers, and focal adolescents (53% female, Mage = 13.70 ± 2.51) participated in this study. The fathers and mothers reported their coparenting behavior to their spouse and the adolescents completed the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment. Structure equation modeling in the total sample revealed that maternal positive and paternal negative coparenting behaviors were related to peer attachment through the indirect effects of father- and mother-adolescent attachments. Multi-group analysis revealed that father- and mother-adolescent attachments had strong predicting effects on the peer attachment of offsprings with the same sex. Maternal positive coparenting behavior was related to the peer attachment of boys and girls through the indirect effects of the father- and mother-adolescent attachments. Paternal negative coparenting behavior had a double-edged effect on girls' peer attachment and was not related to boys' peer attachment. This study extended the perspective of a family-peer system linkage by providing evidence that parents' individual behavior in the coparenting process was linked to adolescents' peer outcome. Moreover, this research suggested that encouraging mothers to enhance their positive relationship with fathers and preventing fathers from overtly pursuing conflicts and covertly disparaging mothers may be effective methods to promote adolescents' peer relationships. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31309414/Coparenting_Behavior_Parent_Adolescent_Attachment_and_Peer_Attachment:_An_Examination_of_Gender_Differences_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01068-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -