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Selection of new chemicals to be used in conditioned aversion for non-lethal predation control.
Behav Processes 2019; 166:103905BP

Abstract

Globally, native predators and scavengers are threatened through the incidence of illegal poisoning due to increasing human-wildlife conflicts. The use of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) may mitigate such conflicts. CTA is a robust learning paradigm that occurs when animals associate a food with a discomfort induced by a chemical, thereby avoiding that food in subsequent encounters. We reviewed the potential of 167 chemical compounds to be used in CTA, considering effects, margin of safety, accessibility, and detectability. After the review, 15 compounds fulfilled the required characteristics, but only five (thiabendazole, thiram, levamisole, fluconazole and fluralaner) were finally selected to be tested in CTA assays with dogs. Of the tested compounds, thiabendazole, thiram and levamisole caused target food rejection by dogs and reduced the time spent eating during post-conditioning. However, despite being microencapsulated, levamisole appeared to be detectable by dogs, whereas thiram and thiabendazole were not. Fluconazole and fluralaner did not produce any CTA effect. Thiabendazole, thiram and levamisole can therefore induce CTA, and thus are potential candidates as aversive compounds for wildlife management. Thiram is an undetectable, relatively safe and accessible compound that can induce CTA in canids, and opens new possibilities to develop methods of non-lethal predation control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Ronda de Toledo nº 12, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain. Electronic address: jtobajas47@gmail.com.Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Ronda de Toledo nº 12, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain; Toxicology Area, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain; Toxicology and Risk Assessment Group, Biomedical Research Institute of Murcia (IMIB-Arrixaca), University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain.Toxicology Area, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain.Toxicology Area, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain; Toxicology and Risk Assessment Group, Biomedical Research Institute of Murcia (IMIB-Arrixaca), University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain.Toxicology Area, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain; Toxicology and Risk Assessment Group, Biomedical Research Institute of Murcia (IMIB-Arrixaca), University of Murcia, Campus de Espinardo, 30100, Murcia, Spain.Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Ronda de Toledo nº 12, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain.Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), CSIC-UCLM-JCCM, Ronda de Toledo nº 12, 13071, Ciudad Real, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31310793

Citation

Tobajas, Jorge, et al. "Selection of New Chemicals to Be Used in Conditioned Aversion for Non-lethal Predation Control." Behavioural Processes, vol. 166, 2019, p. 103905.
Tobajas J, Gómez-Ramírez P, María-Mojica P, et al. Selection of new chemicals to be used in conditioned aversion for non-lethal predation control. Behav Processes. 2019;166:103905.
Tobajas, J., Gómez-Ramírez, P., María-Mojica, P., Navas, I., García-Fernández, A. J., Ferreras, P., & Mateo, R. (2019). Selection of new chemicals to be used in conditioned aversion for non-lethal predation control. Behavioural Processes, 166, p. 103905. doi:10.1016/j.beproc.2019.103905.
Tobajas J, et al. Selection of New Chemicals to Be Used in Conditioned Aversion for Non-lethal Predation Control. Behav Processes. 2019;166:103905. PubMed PMID: 31310793.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Selection of new chemicals to be used in conditioned aversion for non-lethal predation control. AU - Tobajas,Jorge, AU - Gómez-Ramírez,Pilar, AU - María-Mojica,Pedro, AU - Navas,Isabel, AU - García-Fernández,Antonio Juan, AU - Ferreras,Pablo, AU - Mateo,Rafael, Y1 - 2019/07/13/ PY - 2019/03/26/received PY - 2019/06/21/revised PY - 2019/07/09/accepted PY - 2019/7/17/pubmed PY - 2019/7/17/medline PY - 2019/7/17/entrez KW - Conditioned food aversion KW - Learned aversion KW - Non-lethal predator control KW - Predation conflict KW - Wildlife management SP - 103905 EP - 103905 JF - Behavioural processes JO - Behav. Processes VL - 166 N2 - Globally, native predators and scavengers are threatened through the incidence of illegal poisoning due to increasing human-wildlife conflicts. The use of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) may mitigate such conflicts. CTA is a robust learning paradigm that occurs when animals associate a food with a discomfort induced by a chemical, thereby avoiding that food in subsequent encounters. We reviewed the potential of 167 chemical compounds to be used in CTA, considering effects, margin of safety, accessibility, and detectability. After the review, 15 compounds fulfilled the required characteristics, but only five (thiabendazole, thiram, levamisole, fluconazole and fluralaner) were finally selected to be tested in CTA assays with dogs. Of the tested compounds, thiabendazole, thiram and levamisole caused target food rejection by dogs and reduced the time spent eating during post-conditioning. However, despite being microencapsulated, levamisole appeared to be detectable by dogs, whereas thiram and thiabendazole were not. Fluconazole and fluralaner did not produce any CTA effect. Thiabendazole, thiram and levamisole can therefore induce CTA, and thus are potential candidates as aversive compounds for wildlife management. Thiram is an undetectable, relatively safe and accessible compound that can induce CTA in canids, and opens new possibilities to develop methods of non-lethal predation control. SN - 1872-8308 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31310793/Selection_of_new_chemicals_to_be_used_in_conditioned_aversion_for_non-lethal_predation_control L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-6357(19)30128-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -