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Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals.
Mol Biol Evol. 2019 10 01; 36(10):2171-2183.MB

Abstract

Diet is a key factor in determining and structuring animal diversity and adaptive radiations. The mammalian fossil record preserves phenotypic evidence of many dietary shifts, whereas genetic changes followed by dietary diversification in mammals remain largely unknown. To test whether living mammals preserve molecular evidence of dietary shifts, we examined the trehalase gene (Treh), which encodes an enzyme capable of digesting trehalose from insect blood, in bats and other mammals with diverse diets. Bats represent the largest dietary radiation among all mammalian orders, with independent origins of frugivory, nectarivory, carnivory, omnivory, and even sanguivory in an otherwise insectivorous clade. We found that Treh has been inactivated in unrelated bat lineages that independently radiated into noninsectivorous niches. Consistently, purifying selection has been markedly relaxed in noninsectivorous bats compared with their insectivorous relatives. Enzymatic assays of intestinal trehalase in bats suggest that trehalase activity tends to be lost or markedly reduced in noninsectivorous bats compared with their insectivorous relatives. Furthermore, our survey of Treh in 119 mammal species, which represent a deeper evolutionary timeframe, additionally identified a number of other independent losses of Treh in noninsectivorous species, recapitulating the evolutionary pattern that we found in bats. These results document a molecular record of dietary diversification in mammals, and suggest that such molecular signatures of dietary shifts would help us understand both historical and modern changes of animal diets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ecology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Cell Homeostasis, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China.Department of Ecology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Cell Homeostasis, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China. Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China.Department of Mammalogy, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY.Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China.Department of Ecology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Cell Homeostasis, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, China.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31311032

Citation

Jiao, Hengwu, et al. "Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals." Molecular Biology and Evolution, vol. 36, no. 10, 2019, pp. 2171-2183.
Jiao H, Zhang L, Xie HW, et al. Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals. Mol Biol Evol. 2019;36(10):2171-2183.
Jiao, H., Zhang, L., Xie, H. W., Simmons, N. B., Liu, H., & Zhao, H. (2019). Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 36(10), 2171-2183. https://doi.org/10.1093/molbev/msz127
Jiao H, et al. Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals. Mol Biol Evol. 2019 10 1;36(10):2171-2183. PubMed PMID: 31311032.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trehalase Gene as a Molecular Signature of Dietary Diversification in Mammals. AU - Jiao,Hengwu, AU - Zhang,Libiao, AU - Xie,Huan-Wang, AU - Simmons,Nancy B, AU - Liu,Hui, AU - Zhao,Huabin, PY - 2019/7/17/pubmed PY - 2020/1/7/medline PY - 2019/7/17/entrez KW - bats KW - diet KW - mammals KW - pseudogenization KW - trehalase SP - 2171 EP - 2183 JF - Molecular biology and evolution JO - Mol. Biol. Evol. VL - 36 IS - 10 N2 - Diet is a key factor in determining and structuring animal diversity and adaptive radiations. The mammalian fossil record preserves phenotypic evidence of many dietary shifts, whereas genetic changes followed by dietary diversification in mammals remain largely unknown. To test whether living mammals preserve molecular evidence of dietary shifts, we examined the trehalase gene (Treh), which encodes an enzyme capable of digesting trehalose from insect blood, in bats and other mammals with diverse diets. Bats represent the largest dietary radiation among all mammalian orders, with independent origins of frugivory, nectarivory, carnivory, omnivory, and even sanguivory in an otherwise insectivorous clade. We found that Treh has been inactivated in unrelated bat lineages that independently radiated into noninsectivorous niches. Consistently, purifying selection has been markedly relaxed in noninsectivorous bats compared with their insectivorous relatives. Enzymatic assays of intestinal trehalase in bats suggest that trehalase activity tends to be lost or markedly reduced in noninsectivorous bats compared with their insectivorous relatives. Furthermore, our survey of Treh in 119 mammal species, which represent a deeper evolutionary timeframe, additionally identified a number of other independent losses of Treh in noninsectivorous species, recapitulating the evolutionary pattern that we found in bats. These results document a molecular record of dietary diversification in mammals, and suggest that such molecular signatures of dietary shifts would help us understand both historical and modern changes of animal diets. SN - 1537-1719 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31311032/Trehalase_Gene_as_a_Molecular_Signature_of_Dietary_Diversification_in_Mammals_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/mbe/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/molbev/msz127 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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