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Functional network connectivity impairments and core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.
Hum Brain Mapp 2019; 40(16):4593-4605HB

Abstract

Cognitive deficits contribute to functional disability in patients with schizophrenia and may be related to altered functional networks that serve cognition. We evaluated the integrity of major functional networks and assessed their role in supporting two cognitive functions affected in schizophrenia: processing speed (PS) and working memory (WM). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data, N = 261 patients and 327 controls, were aggregated from three independent cohorts and evaluated using Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta Analysis rsfMRI analysis pipeline. Meta- and mega-analyses were used to evaluate patient-control differences in functional connectivity (FC) measures. Canonical correlation analysis was used to study the association between cognitive deficits and FC measures. Patients showed consistent patterns of cognitive and resting-state FC (rsFC) deficits across three cohorts. Patient-control differences in rsFC calculated using seed-based and dual-regression approaches were consistent (Cohen's d: 0.31 ± 0.09 and 0.29 ± 0.08, p < 10-4). RsFC measures explained 12-17% of the individual variations in PS and WM in the full sample and in patients and controls separately, with the strongest correlations found in salience, auditory, somatosensory, and default-mode networks. The pattern of association between rsFC (within-network) and PS (r = .45, p = .07) and WM (r = .36, p = .16), and rsFC (between-network) and PS (r = .52, p = 8.4 × 10-3) and WM (r = .47, p = .02), derived from multiple networks was related to effect size of patient-control differences in the functional networks. No association was detected between rsFC and current medication dose or psychosis ratings. Patients demonstrated significant reduction in several FC networks that may partially underlie some of the core neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The strength of connectivity-cognition relationships in different networks was strongly associated with network's vulnerability to schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Imaging Genetics Center, Mark & Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging & Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Marina del Rey, California.Imaging Genetics Center, Mark & Mary Stevens Institute for Neuroimaging & Informatics, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Marina del Rey, California.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31313441

Citation

Adhikari, Bhim M., et al. "Functional Network Connectivity Impairments and Core Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia." Human Brain Mapping, vol. 40, no. 16, 2019, pp. 4593-4605.
Adhikari BM, Hong LE, Sampath H, et al. Functional network connectivity impairments and core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Hum Brain Mapp. 2019;40(16):4593-4605.
Adhikari, B. M., Hong, L. E., Sampath, H., Chiappelli, J., Jahanshad, N., Thompson, P. M., ... Kochunov, P. (2019). Functional network connectivity impairments and core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Human Brain Mapping, 40(16), pp. 4593-4605. doi:10.1002/hbm.24723.
Adhikari BM, et al. Functional Network Connectivity Impairments and Core Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia. Hum Brain Mapp. 2019 11 1;40(16):4593-4605. PubMed PMID: 31313441.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Functional network connectivity impairments and core cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. AU - Adhikari,Bhim M, AU - Hong,L Elliot, AU - Sampath,Hemalatha, AU - Chiappelli,Joshua, AU - Jahanshad,Neda, AU - Thompson,Paul M, AU - Rowland,Laura M, AU - Calhoun,Vince D, AU - Du,Xiaoming, AU - Chen,Shuo, AU - Kochunov,Peter, Y1 - 2019/07/16/ PY - 2019/03/27/received PY - 2019/07/03/revised PY - 2019/07/08/accepted PY - 2019/7/18/pubmed PY - 2019/7/18/medline PY - 2019/7/18/entrez KW - effect size KW - processing speed KW - resting-state functional connectivity KW - working memory SP - 4593 EP - 4605 JF - Human brain mapping JO - Hum Brain Mapp VL - 40 IS - 16 N2 - Cognitive deficits contribute to functional disability in patients with schizophrenia and may be related to altered functional networks that serve cognition. We evaluated the integrity of major functional networks and assessed their role in supporting two cognitive functions affected in schizophrenia: processing speed (PS) and working memory (WM). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data, N = 261 patients and 327 controls, were aggregated from three independent cohorts and evaluated using Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta Analysis rsfMRI analysis pipeline. Meta- and mega-analyses were used to evaluate patient-control differences in functional connectivity (FC) measures. Canonical correlation analysis was used to study the association between cognitive deficits and FC measures. Patients showed consistent patterns of cognitive and resting-state FC (rsFC) deficits across three cohorts. Patient-control differences in rsFC calculated using seed-based and dual-regression approaches were consistent (Cohen's d: 0.31 ± 0.09 and 0.29 ± 0.08, p < 10-4). RsFC measures explained 12-17% of the individual variations in PS and WM in the full sample and in patients and controls separately, with the strongest correlations found in salience, auditory, somatosensory, and default-mode networks. The pattern of association between rsFC (within-network) and PS (r = .45, p = .07) and WM (r = .36, p = .16), and rsFC (between-network) and PS (r = .52, p = 8.4 × 10-3) and WM (r = .47, p = .02), derived from multiple networks was related to effect size of patient-control differences in the functional networks. No association was detected between rsFC and current medication dose or psychosis ratings. Patients demonstrated significant reduction in several FC networks that may partially underlie some of the core neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The strength of connectivity-cognition relationships in different networks was strongly associated with network's vulnerability to schizophrenia. SN - 1097-0193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31313441/Functional_network_connectivity_impairments_and_core_cognitive_deficits_in_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24723 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -