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The lexical semantics of adjective-noun phrases in the human brain.
Hum Brain Mapp 2019; 40(15):4457-4469HB

Abstract

As a person reads, the brain performs complex operations to create higher order semantic representations from individual words. While these steps are effortless for competent readers, we are only beginning to understand how the brain performs these actions. Here, we explore lexical semantics using magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of people reading adjective-noun phrases presented one word at a time. We track the neural representation of single word representations over time, through different brain regions. Our results reveal two novel findings: (a) a neural representation of the adjective is present during noun presentation, but this representation is different from that observed during adjective presentation and (b) the neural representation of adjective semantics observed during adjective reading is reactivated after phrase reading, with remarkable consistency. We also note that while the semantic representation of the adjective during the reading of the adjective is very distributed, the later representations are concentrated largely to temporal and frontal areas previously associated with composition. Taken together, these results paint a picture of information flow in the brain as phrases are read and understood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Computing Science & Psychology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.Machine Learning Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Machine Learning Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Machine Learning Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31313467

Citation

Fyshe, Alona, et al. "The Lexical Semantics of Adjective-noun Phrases in the Human Brain." Human Brain Mapping, vol. 40, no. 15, 2019, pp. 4457-4469.
Fyshe A, Sudre G, Wehbe L, et al. The lexical semantics of adjective-noun phrases in the human brain. Hum Brain Mapp. 2019;40(15):4457-4469.
Fyshe, A., Sudre, G., Wehbe, L., Rafidi, N., & Mitchell, T. M. (2019). The lexical semantics of adjective-noun phrases in the human brain. Human Brain Mapping, 40(15), pp. 4457-4469. doi:10.1002/hbm.24714.
Fyshe A, et al. The Lexical Semantics of Adjective-noun Phrases in the Human Brain. Hum Brain Mapp. 2019 10 15;40(15):4457-4469. PubMed PMID: 31313467.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The lexical semantics of adjective-noun phrases in the human brain. AU - Fyshe,Alona, AU - Sudre,Gustavo, AU - Wehbe,Leila, AU - Rafidi,Nicole, AU - Mitchell,Tom M, Y1 - 2019/07/16/ PY - 2019/03/29/received PY - 2019/06/14/revised PY - 2019/06/28/accepted PY - 2019/7/18/pubmed PY - 2019/7/18/medline PY - 2019/7/18/entrez KW - language comprehension KW - magnetoencephalography KW - semantic composition KW - semantic representations SP - 4457 EP - 4469 JF - Human brain mapping JO - Hum Brain Mapp VL - 40 IS - 15 N2 - As a person reads, the brain performs complex operations to create higher order semantic representations from individual words. While these steps are effortless for competent readers, we are only beginning to understand how the brain performs these actions. Here, we explore lexical semantics using magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings of people reading adjective-noun phrases presented one word at a time. We track the neural representation of single word representations over time, through different brain regions. Our results reveal two novel findings: (a) a neural representation of the adjective is present during noun presentation, but this representation is different from that observed during adjective presentation and (b) the neural representation of adjective semantics observed during adjective reading is reactivated after phrase reading, with remarkable consistency. We also note that while the semantic representation of the adjective during the reading of the adjective is very distributed, the later representations are concentrated largely to temporal and frontal areas previously associated with composition. Taken together, these results paint a picture of information flow in the brain as phrases are read and understood. SN - 1097-0193 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31313467/The_lexical_semantics_of_adjective_noun_phrases_in_the_human_brain_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24714 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -