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The influence of intention and outcome on young children's reciprocal sharing.
J Exp Child Psychol 2019; 187:104645JE

Abstract

This study investigated the influence of underlying intentions and outcomes of a partner's sharing behavior on young children's reciprocity. We provided 3- and 5-year-old children with the opportunity to share with a partner following different treatments of a partner's intention (to share or not to share) that led to different outcomes (children got or did not get stickers from their partner). For the 3-year-olds, we found that the outcome of the previous interaction influenced how much they shared, whereas the intention of their partner affected how readily they initiated sharing in response to social cues. For the 5-year-olds, we found that both outcome and intention affected how much they shared as well as how readily they initiated sharing. This suggests that already 3-year-olds are able to take into account outcome and intention information separately in reciprocal sharing. However, only 5-year-olds can combine both to flexibly maintain social interactions without running the risk of being exploited by others.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CAS Key Laboratory of Behavioral Science, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; Department of Psychology, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China. Electronic address: zhangzhen@psych.ac.cn.Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31323596

Citation

Zhang, Zhen, et al. "The Influence of Intention and Outcome On Young Children's Reciprocal Sharing." Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, vol. 187, 2019, p. 104645.
Zhang Z, Grocke P, Tomasello M. The influence of intention and outcome on young children's reciprocal sharing. J Exp Child Psychol. 2019;187:104645.
Zhang, Z., Grocke, P., & Tomasello, M. (2019). The influence of intention and outcome on young children's reciprocal sharing. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 187, p. 104645. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2019.05.012.
Zhang Z, Grocke P, Tomasello M. The Influence of Intention and Outcome On Young Children's Reciprocal Sharing. J Exp Child Psychol. 2019;187:104645. PubMed PMID: 31323596.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of intention and outcome on young children's reciprocal sharing. AU - Zhang,Zhen, AU - Grocke,Patricia, AU - Tomasello,Michael, Y1 - 2019/07/16/ PY - 2018/11/08/received PY - 2019/04/14/revised PY - 2019/05/27/accepted PY - 2019/7/20/pubmed PY - 2019/7/20/medline PY - 2019/7/20/entrez KW - Cooperation KW - Intention KW - Moral development KW - Outcome KW - Reciprocity KW - Sharing SP - 104645 EP - 104645 JF - Journal of experimental child psychology JO - J Exp Child Psychol VL - 187 N2 - This study investigated the influence of underlying intentions and outcomes of a partner's sharing behavior on young children's reciprocity. We provided 3- and 5-year-old children with the opportunity to share with a partner following different treatments of a partner's intention (to share or not to share) that led to different outcomes (children got or did not get stickers from their partner). For the 3-year-olds, we found that the outcome of the previous interaction influenced how much they shared, whereas the intention of their partner affected how readily they initiated sharing in response to social cues. For the 5-year-olds, we found that both outcome and intention affected how much they shared as well as how readily they initiated sharing. This suggests that already 3-year-olds are able to take into account outcome and intention information separately in reciprocal sharing. However, only 5-year-olds can combine both to flexibly maintain social interactions without running the risk of being exploited by others. SN - 1096-0457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31323596/The_influence_of_intention_and_outcome_on_young_children's_reciprocal_sharing L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0965(18)30629-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -