Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Morning plasma cortisol as a cardiovascular risk factor: findings from prospective cohort and Mendelian randomization studies.
Eur J Endocrinol. 2019 Oct; 181(4):429-438.EJ

Abstract

Objective

The identification of new causal risk factors has the potential to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction and the development of new treatments to reduce CVD deaths. In the general population, we sought to determine whether cortisol is a causal risk factor for CVD and coronary heart disease (CHD).

Design and methods

Three approaches were adopted to investigate the association between cortisol and CVD/CHD. First, we used multivariable regression in two prospective nested case-control studies (total 798 participants, 313 incident CVD/CHD with complete data). Second, a random-effects meta-analysis of these data and previously published prospective associations was performed (total 6680 controls, 696 incident CVD/CHD). Finally, one- and two-sample Mendelian randomization analyses were performed (122,737 CHD cases, 547,261 controls for two-sample analyses).

Results

In the two prospective nested case-control studies, logistic regression adjusting for sex, age, BMI, smoking and time of sampling, demonstrated a positive association between morning plasma cortisol and incident CVD (OR: 1.28 per 1 SD higher cortisol, 95% CI: 1.06-1.54). In the meta-analysis of prospective studies, the equivalent result was OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.06-1.31. Results from the two-sample Mendelian randomization were consistent with these positive associations: OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.15.

Conclusions

All three approaches demonstrated a positive association between morning plasma cortisol and incident CVD. Together, these findings suggest that elevated morning cortisol is a causal risk factor for CVD. The current data suggest strategies targeted at lowering cortisol action should be evaluated for their effects on CVD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.Department of Psychology, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden, Germany.Edinburgh Clinical Research Facility, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.Division of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. Institute of Genetic Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31325907

Citation

Crawford, Andrew A., et al. "Morning Plasma Cortisol as a Cardiovascular Risk Factor: Findings From Prospective Cohort and Mendelian Randomization Studies." European Journal of Endocrinology, vol. 181, no. 4, 2019, pp. 429-438.
Crawford AA, Soderberg S, Kirschbaum C, et al. Morning plasma cortisol as a cardiovascular risk factor: findings from prospective cohort and Mendelian randomization studies. Eur J Endocrinol. 2019;181(4):429-438.
Crawford, A. A., Soderberg, S., Kirschbaum, C., Murphy, L., Eliasson, M., Ebrahim, S., Davey Smith, G., Olsson, T., Sattar, N., Lawlor, D. A., Timpson, N. J., Reynolds, R. M., & Walker, B. R. (2019). Morning plasma cortisol as a cardiovascular risk factor: findings from prospective cohort and Mendelian randomization studies. European Journal of Endocrinology, 181(4), 429-438. https://doi.org/10.1530/EJE-19-0161
Crawford AA, et al. Morning Plasma Cortisol as a Cardiovascular Risk Factor: Findings From Prospective Cohort and Mendelian Randomization Studies. Eur J Endocrinol. 2019;181(4):429-438. PubMed PMID: 31325907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Morning plasma cortisol as a cardiovascular risk factor: findings from prospective cohort and Mendelian randomization studies. AU - Crawford,Andrew A, AU - Soderberg,Stefan, AU - Kirschbaum,Clemens, AU - Murphy,Lee, AU - Eliasson,Mats, AU - Ebrahim,Shah, AU - Davey Smith,George, AU - Olsson,Tommy, AU - Sattar,Naveed, AU - Lawlor,Debbie A, AU - Timpson,Nicolas J, AU - Reynolds,Rebecca M, AU - Walker,Brian R, PY - 2019/03/05/received PY - 2019/07/18/accepted PY - 2019/7/22/pubmed PY - 2019/7/22/medline PY - 2019/7/21/entrez SP - 429 EP - 438 JF - European journal of endocrinology JO - Eur. J. Endocrinol. VL - 181 IS - 4 N2 - Objective: The identification of new causal risk factors has the potential to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction and the development of new treatments to reduce CVD deaths. In the general population, we sought to determine whether cortisol is a causal risk factor for CVD and coronary heart disease (CHD). Design and methods: Three approaches were adopted to investigate the association between cortisol and CVD/CHD. First, we used multivariable regression in two prospective nested case-control studies (total 798 participants, 313 incident CVD/CHD with complete data). Second, a random-effects meta-analysis of these data and previously published prospective associations was performed (total 6680 controls, 696 incident CVD/CHD). Finally, one- and two-sample Mendelian randomization analyses were performed (122,737 CHD cases, 547,261 controls for two-sample analyses). Results: In the two prospective nested case-control studies, logistic regression adjusting for sex, age, BMI, smoking and time of sampling, demonstrated a positive association between morning plasma cortisol and incident CVD (OR: 1.28 per 1 SD higher cortisol, 95% CI: 1.06-1.54). In the meta-analysis of prospective studies, the equivalent result was OR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.06-1.31. Results from the two-sample Mendelian randomization were consistent with these positive associations: OR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.98-1.15. Conclusions: All three approaches demonstrated a positive association between morning plasma cortisol and incident CVD. Together, these findings suggest that elevated morning cortisol is a causal risk factor for CVD. The current data suggest strategies targeted at lowering cortisol action should be evaluated for their effects on CVD. SN - 1479-683X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31325907/Morning_plasma_cortisol_as_a_cardiovascular_risk_factor:_findings_from_prospective_cohort_and_Mendelian_randomization_studies L2 - https://eje.bioscientifica.com/doi/10.1530/EJE-19-0161 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.