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Development and characterization of a biomimetic coating for percutaneous devices.

Abstract

Percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetics (POP), which consist of a metallic post attached to the bone that extends outward through the skin to connect to an external prosthesis, have become a clinically relevant option to replace the typical socket-residual limb connection. POP devices offer several advantages such as mechanical off-loading of soft tissues, direct force transfer to the musculoskeletal system, greater proprioception, and overall improvement in limb kinesis compared to a socket system. However, POP devices create several challenges including epidermal downgrowth, increased infection risk, and mechanical tearing at the skin-implant interface. To address these issues, biomimetic surfaces and coatings have been developed in an attempt to create an infection-free and cohesive interface between POP devices and skin. The fingernail is a prime example of a natural system with a skin interface that is both mechanically and biologically stable. Exploiting keratins' previously demonstrated tissue compatibility and creating a biomimetic coating for POP devices that can imitate the human fingernail, and demonstrating its ability to promote a stable interface with skin tissue is the goal of this work. Silane coupling aided in producing a coating on titanium substrates consisting of human keratin proteins. Several combinations of silane and keratin derivatives were investigated, and in general showed a nano-scale coating thickness that supported skin cell (i.e. fibroblast and keratinocyte) adhesion. Initial enzyme-mediated degradation resistance was also demonstrated, but the coatings appeared to degrade at long time periods. Importantly, keratinocytes showed a stable phenotype with no indication of wound healing-like activity. These data provide justification to further explore keratin biomaterials for POP coatings that may stabilize the implant-skin interface.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States.Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, United States. Electronic address: mvandyk5@vt.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31326624

Citation

Trent, Alexis, and Mark E. Van Dyke. "Development and Characterization of a Biomimetic Coating for Percutaneous Devices." Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces, vol. 182, 2019, p. 110351.
Trent A, Van Dyke ME. Development and characterization of a biomimetic coating for percutaneous devices. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces. 2019;182:110351.
Trent, A., & Van Dyke, M. E. (2019). Development and characterization of a biomimetic coating for percutaneous devices. Colloids and Surfaces. B, Biointerfaces, 182, p. 110351. doi:10.1016/j.colsurfb.2019.110351.
Trent A, Van Dyke ME. Development and Characterization of a Biomimetic Coating for Percutaneous Devices. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces. 2019 Jul 8;182:110351. PubMed PMID: 31326624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Development and characterization of a biomimetic coating for percutaneous devices. AU - Trent,Alexis, AU - Van Dyke,Mark E, Y1 - 2019/07/08/ PY - 2019/02/22/received PY - 2019/06/19/revised PY - 2019/07/06/accepted PY - 2019/7/22/pubmed PY - 2019/7/22/medline PY - 2019/7/22/entrez KW - Biomimetic KW - Coating KW - Keratin KW - Osseointegrated KW - Percutaneous KW - Prosthetic SP - 110351 EP - 110351 JF - Colloids and surfaces. B, Biointerfaces JO - Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces VL - 182 N2 - Percutaneous osseointegrated prosthetics (POP), which consist of a metallic post attached to the bone that extends outward through the skin to connect to an external prosthesis, have become a clinically relevant option to replace the typical socket-residual limb connection. POP devices offer several advantages such as mechanical off-loading of soft tissues, direct force transfer to the musculoskeletal system, greater proprioception, and overall improvement in limb kinesis compared to a socket system. However, POP devices create several challenges including epidermal downgrowth, increased infection risk, and mechanical tearing at the skin-implant interface. To address these issues, biomimetic surfaces and coatings have been developed in an attempt to create an infection-free and cohesive interface between POP devices and skin. The fingernail is a prime example of a natural system with a skin interface that is both mechanically and biologically stable. Exploiting keratins' previously demonstrated tissue compatibility and creating a biomimetic coating for POP devices that can imitate the human fingernail, and demonstrating its ability to promote a stable interface with skin tissue is the goal of this work. Silane coupling aided in producing a coating on titanium substrates consisting of human keratin proteins. Several combinations of silane and keratin derivatives were investigated, and in general showed a nano-scale coating thickness that supported skin cell (i.e. fibroblast and keratinocyte) adhesion. Initial enzyme-mediated degradation resistance was also demonstrated, but the coatings appeared to degrade at long time periods. Importantly, keratinocytes showed a stable phenotype with no indication of wound healing-like activity. These data provide justification to further explore keratin biomaterials for POP coatings that may stabilize the implant-skin interface. SN - 1873-4367 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31326624/Development_and_characterization_of_a_biomimetic_coating_for_percutaneous_devices L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0927-7765(19)30485-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -