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Attenuation of size illusion effect in dual-task conditions.
Hum Mov Sci. 2019 Oct; 67:102497.HM

Abstract

We over-estimate or under-estimate the size of an object depending its background structure (e.g., the Ebbinghaus illusion). Since deciding and preparing to execute a movement is based on perception, motor performance deteriorates due to the faulty perception of information. Therefore, such cognitive process can be a source of a failure in motor performance, although we feel in control of our performance through conscious cognitive activities. If a movement execution process can avoid distraction by the illusion-deceived conscious process, the effect of the visual illusion on visuomotor performance can be eliminated or attenuated. This study investigated this hypothesis by examining two task performances developed for a target figure inducing the Ebbinghaus size illusion: showing visually perceived size of an object by index finger-thumb aperture (size-matching), and reaching out for the object and pretending to grasp it (pantomimed grasping). In these task performances, the size of the index finger-thumb aperture becomes larger or smaller than the actual size, in accordance with the illusion effect. This study examined whether the size illusion effect can be weakened or eliminated by the dual-task condition where actors' attention to judge the object's size and to produce the aperture size is interrupted. 16 participants performed the size-matching and pantomimed grasping tasks while simultaneously executing a choice reaction task (dual task) or without doing so (single task). Using an optical motion capture system, the size-illusion effect was analyzed in terms of the aperture size, which indicates the visually perceived object size. The illusion effect was attenuated in the dual task condition, compared to it in the single task condition. This suggests that the dual task condition modulated attention focus on the aperture movement and therefore the aperture movement was achieved with less distraction caused by illusory information.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Sports and Health Science, Daito-Bunka University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: hiromu@xd6.so-net.ne.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31326743

Citation

Katsumata, Hiromu. "Attenuation of Size Illusion Effect in Dual-task Conditions." Human Movement Science, vol. 67, 2019, p. 102497.
Katsumata H. Attenuation of size illusion effect in dual-task conditions. Hum Mov Sci. 2019;67:102497.
Katsumata, H. (2019). Attenuation of size illusion effect in dual-task conditions. Human Movement Science, 67, 102497. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2019.102497
Katsumata H. Attenuation of Size Illusion Effect in Dual-task Conditions. Hum Mov Sci. 2019;67:102497. PubMed PMID: 31326743.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Attenuation of size illusion effect in dual-task conditions. A1 - Katsumata,Hiromu, Y1 - 2019/07/18/ PY - 2018/06/17/received PY - 2019/06/08/revised PY - 2019/07/06/accepted PY - 2019/7/22/pubmed PY - 2020/1/14/medline PY - 2019/7/22/entrez KW - Dual task paradigm KW - Perceptual illusion KW - Ventral/dorsal stream KW - Visuomotor control SP - 102497 EP - 102497 JF - Human movement science JO - Hum Mov Sci VL - 67 N2 - We over-estimate or under-estimate the size of an object depending its background structure (e.g., the Ebbinghaus illusion). Since deciding and preparing to execute a movement is based on perception, motor performance deteriorates due to the faulty perception of information. Therefore, such cognitive process can be a source of a failure in motor performance, although we feel in control of our performance through conscious cognitive activities. If a movement execution process can avoid distraction by the illusion-deceived conscious process, the effect of the visual illusion on visuomotor performance can be eliminated or attenuated. This study investigated this hypothesis by examining two task performances developed for a target figure inducing the Ebbinghaus size illusion: showing visually perceived size of an object by index finger-thumb aperture (size-matching), and reaching out for the object and pretending to grasp it (pantomimed grasping). In these task performances, the size of the index finger-thumb aperture becomes larger or smaller than the actual size, in accordance with the illusion effect. This study examined whether the size illusion effect can be weakened or eliminated by the dual-task condition where actors' attention to judge the object's size and to produce the aperture size is interrupted. 16 participants performed the size-matching and pantomimed grasping tasks while simultaneously executing a choice reaction task (dual task) or without doing so (single task). Using an optical motion capture system, the size-illusion effect was analyzed in terms of the aperture size, which indicates the visually perceived object size. The illusion effect was attenuated in the dual task condition, compared to it in the single task condition. This suggests that the dual task condition modulated attention focus on the aperture movement and therefore the aperture movement was achieved with less distraction caused by illusory information. SN - 1872-7646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31326743/Attenuation_of_size_illusion_effect_in_dual_task_conditions_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-9457(18)30427-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -