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Capgras' Delusion: A Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases.
Psychopathology 2019; 52(3):161-173P

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Capgras' delusion has captured psychiatrists' imaginations, but the clinical features of the delusion have rarely been studied and presented systematically.

AIMS

The present study systematically reviews all case reports on Capgras' delusion in the English language in order to better understand differences between organic and functional aetiologies.

METHODS

All medical and psychiatric databases were searched, as were the bibliographies of published case reports, narrative reviews, and book chapters.

RESULTS

A total of 258 cases were identified from 175 papers. Functional Capgras' delusion was more associated with a wider variety of imposters; multiple imposters; other misidentification syndromes; auditory hallucinations; other delusions; and formal thought disorder. Organic cases were associated with age; inanimate objects; memory and visual-spatial impairments; right hemispheric dysfunction; and visual hallucinations. Executive dysfunction and aggression were associated with both types.

CONCLUSIONS

Specific features of the -Capgras' delusional content and associated signs point to either organic or functional aetiology. The delusion is more amorphous than many theorists have supposed, which challenges their explanatory models.

Authors+Show Affiliations

North East London NHS Foundation Trust, Rainham, United Kingdom.Department of Neuropsychiatry, St. George's Hospital, London, United Kingdom.Department of Neuropsychiatry, St. George's Hospital, London, United Kingdom, norman.poole@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31326968

Citation

Pandis, Charalampos, et al. "Capgras' Delusion: a Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases." Psychopathology, vol. 52, no. 3, 2019, pp. 161-173.
Pandis C, Agrawal N, Poole N. Capgras' Delusion: A Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases. Psychopathology. 2019;52(3):161-173.
Pandis, C., Agrawal, N., & Poole, N. (2019). Capgras' Delusion: A Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases. Psychopathology, 52(3), pp. 161-173. doi:10.1159/000500474.
Pandis C, Agrawal N, Poole N. Capgras' Delusion: a Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases. Psychopathology. 2019;52(3):161-173. PubMed PMID: 31326968.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Capgras' Delusion: A Systematic Review of 255 Published Cases. AU - Pandis,Charalampos, AU - Agrawal,Niruj, AU - Poole,Norman, Y1 - 2019/07/19/ PY - 2018/10/29/received PY - 2019/04/15/accepted PY - 2019/7/22/pubmed PY - 2019/7/22/medline PY - 2019/7/22/entrez KW - Capgras’ syndrome KW - Cognitive neuropsychiatry KW - Misidentification syndrome KW - Organic syndromes KW - Psychotic disorders SP - 161 EP - 173 JF - Psychopathology JO - Psychopathology VL - 52 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Capgras' delusion has captured psychiatrists' imaginations, but the clinical features of the delusion have rarely been studied and presented systematically. AIMS: The present study systematically reviews all case reports on Capgras' delusion in the English language in order to better understand differences between organic and functional aetiologies. METHODS: All medical and psychiatric databases were searched, as were the bibliographies of published case reports, narrative reviews, and book chapters. RESULTS: A total of 258 cases were identified from 175 papers. Functional Capgras' delusion was more associated with a wider variety of imposters; multiple imposters; other misidentification syndromes; auditory hallucinations; other delusions; and formal thought disorder. Organic cases were associated with age; inanimate objects; memory and visual-spatial impairments; right hemispheric dysfunction; and visual hallucinations. Executive dysfunction and aggression were associated with both types. CONCLUSIONS: Specific features of the -Capgras' delusional content and associated signs point to either organic or functional aetiology. The delusion is more amorphous than many theorists have supposed, which challenges their explanatory models. SN - 1423-033X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31326968/Capgras'_Delusion:_A_Systematic_Review_of_255_Published_Cases_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000500474 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -