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The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact on US General Practice Veterinarians.
Front Vet Sci 2019; 6:222FV

Abstract

Objective:

To assess the impact of the human opioid epidemic and associated shortages in drug supply on US general practice veterinarians.

Design:

Cross-sectional study. Sample: Members of the Veterinary Information Network (VIN). Procedures: An electronic survey was used to examine veterinarians' views regarding opioid use in veterinary medicine and the impact of the opioid shortage on the provision of care. The survey was distributed via the VIN data collection portal from October 12-November 6, 2018.

Results:

697 veterinarians completed the survey. Most (99.7%) reported using, dispensing or prescribing opioids in veterinary practice. The most commonly used opioids were buprenorphine, tramadol and butorphanol. While most veterinarians (83.3%) reported difficulty in ordering opioids over the last 6 months, this decreased to 59.0% in the last month. The most difficult drugs to obtain were hydromorphone, morphine, injectable fentanyl, and oxymorphone. The reported rate of difficulty in obtaining all these drugs lessened over time. However, the opioid shortage caused significant difficulty in providing appropriate pain management for 41.1% of participants, and affected the ability of 44.8% of respondents to provide optimal anesthesia. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Veterinarians' ability to provide opioids for their patients has been impacted by the opioid shortage, with a greater impact on full mu opioid agonists as compared to drugs like butorphanol, buprenorphine, and tramadol. The results confirm the important role of opioid analgesics in the delivery of modern veterinary medicine and highlight the importance of medical health professionals being able to access these critical medications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States.Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, United States.Veterinary Information Network, Davis, CA, United States.Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31334257

Citation

Kogan, Lori, et al. "The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact On US General Practice Veterinarians." Frontiers in Veterinary Science, vol. 6, 2019, p. 222.
Kogan L, Hellyer P, Rishniw M, et al. The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact on US General Practice Veterinarians. Front Vet Sci. 2019;6:222.
Kogan, L., Hellyer, P., Rishniw, M., & Schoenfeld-Tacher, R. (2019). The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact on US General Practice Veterinarians. Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 6, p. 222. doi:10.3389/fvets.2019.00222.
Kogan L, et al. The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact On US General Practice Veterinarians. Front Vet Sci. 2019;6:222. PubMed PMID: 31334257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The US Opioid Epidemic and Its Impact on US General Practice Veterinarians. AU - Kogan,Lori, AU - Hellyer,Peter, AU - Rishniw,Mark, AU - Schoenfeld-Tacher,Regina, Y1 - 2019/07/04/ PY - 2019/03/28/received PY - 2019/06/19/accepted PY - 2019/7/24/entrez PY - 2019/7/25/pubmed PY - 2019/7/25/medline KW - anesthesia KW - opioid KW - pain management KW - shortage KW - veterinary SP - 222 EP - 222 JF - Frontiers in veterinary science JO - Front Vet Sci VL - 6 N2 - Objective: To assess the impact of the human opioid epidemic and associated shortages in drug supply on US general practice veterinarians. Design: Cross-sectional study. Sample: Members of the Veterinary Information Network (VIN). Procedures: An electronic survey was used to examine veterinarians' views regarding opioid use in veterinary medicine and the impact of the opioid shortage on the provision of care. The survey was distributed via the VIN data collection portal from October 12-November 6, 2018. Results: 697 veterinarians completed the survey. Most (99.7%) reported using, dispensing or prescribing opioids in veterinary practice. The most commonly used opioids were buprenorphine, tramadol and butorphanol. While most veterinarians (83.3%) reported difficulty in ordering opioids over the last 6 months, this decreased to 59.0% in the last month. The most difficult drugs to obtain were hydromorphone, morphine, injectable fentanyl, and oxymorphone. The reported rate of difficulty in obtaining all these drugs lessened over time. However, the opioid shortage caused significant difficulty in providing appropriate pain management for 41.1% of participants, and affected the ability of 44.8% of respondents to provide optimal anesthesia. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance: Veterinarians' ability to provide opioids for their patients has been impacted by the opioid shortage, with a greater impact on full mu opioid agonists as compared to drugs like butorphanol, buprenorphine, and tramadol. The results confirm the important role of opioid analgesics in the delivery of modern veterinary medicine and highlight the importance of medical health professionals being able to access these critical medications. SN - 2297-1769 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31334257/The_US_Opioid_Epidemic_and_Its_Impact_on_US_General_Practice_Veterinarians L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2019.00222 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -