Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
Eur J Clin Invest. 2019 Sep; 49(9):e13158.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Increasing evidence indicates that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is linked to an increased risk of extra-hepatic conditions. However, it is currently uncertain whether NAFLD is associated with the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies to examine the association between NAFLD and the risk of GERD.

METHODS

We searched PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Web of Science from 1 January 1975 to 15 December 2018, using predefined terms to identify cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies investigating the association between NAFLD and GERD.

RESULTS

Nine observational studies involving 185 118 subjects were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Overall, NAFLD was significantly associated with an increased risk of GERD (random effect OR 1.28; 95% CI: 1.12-1.44, I2 = 82%). Moreover, the significant association between NAFLD and GERD was consistent both for studies with adjusted OR/HR (n = 6, random effect OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03-1.30) and those with unadjusted OR/HR (n = 3, random effect OR = 2.09, 95% CI: 1.62-2.56) as measures of effect. Both funnel plot and Egger's test suggested the existence of publication bias. However, a sensitivity analysis by sequentially omitting each study did not alter the pooled outcome,suggesting the robustness of the association.

CONCLUSION

NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of GERD. However, future large and cohort studies are still needed to determine the causal relationship between NAFLD and the risk of GERD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Thoracic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Hepatobiliary-Pancreatic Surgery, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine Center, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31338830

Citation

Xue, Jinru, et al. "Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Increases the Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." European Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 49, no. 9, 2019, pp. e13158.
Xue J, Xin H, Ren N, et al. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur J Clin Invest. 2019;49(9):e13158.
Xue, J., Xin, H., Ren, N., Zhou, C., Yang, J., Song, L., & Qin, S. (2019). Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 49(9), e13158. https://doi.org/10.1111/eci.13158
Xue J, et al. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Increases the Risk of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. Eur J Clin Invest. 2019;49(9):e13158. PubMed PMID: 31338830.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Xue,Jinru, AU - Xin,Hua, AU - Ren,Na, AU - Zhou,Changyu, AU - Yang,Jinghui, AU - Song,Lina, AU - Qin,Shaoyou, Y1 - 2019/08/19/ PY - 2018/12/16/received PY - 2019/04/07/revised PY - 2019/07/19/accepted PY - 2019/7/25/pubmed PY - 2020/6/2/medline PY - 2019/7/25/entrez KW - gastroesophageal reflux disease KW - meta-analysis KW - nonalcoholic fatty liver disease SP - e13158 EP - e13158 JF - European journal of clinical investigation JO - Eur J Clin Invest VL - 49 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Increasing evidence indicates that nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is linked to an increased risk of extra-hepatic conditions. However, it is currently uncertain whether NAFLD is associated with the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of relevant studies to examine the association between NAFLD and the risk of GERD. METHODS: We searched PubMed, Scopus, Embase and Web of Science from 1 January 1975 to 15 December 2018, using predefined terms to identify cross-sectional, case-control and cohort studies investigating the association between NAFLD and GERD. RESULTS: Nine observational studies involving 185 118 subjects were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. Overall, NAFLD was significantly associated with an increased risk of GERD (random effect OR 1.28; 95% CI: 1.12-1.44, I2 = 82%). Moreover, the significant association between NAFLD and GERD was consistent both for studies with adjusted OR/HR (n = 6, random effect OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 1.03-1.30) and those with unadjusted OR/HR (n = 3, random effect OR = 2.09, 95% CI: 1.62-2.56) as measures of effect. Both funnel plot and Egger's test suggested the existence of publication bias. However, a sensitivity analysis by sequentially omitting each study did not alter the pooled outcome,suggesting the robustness of the association. CONCLUSION: NAFLD is associated with an increased risk of GERD. However, future large and cohort studies are still needed to determine the causal relationship between NAFLD and the risk of GERD. SN - 1365-2362 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31338830/Nonalcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_increases_the_risk_of_gastroesophageal_reflux_disease:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/eci.13158 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -