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The role of the skin microbiota in acne pathophysiology.
Br J Dermatol. 2019 10; 181(4):691-699.BJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The role of skin microbiota in acne remains to be fully elucidated. Initial culture-based investigations were hampered by growth rate and selective media bias. Even with less biased genomic methods, sampling, lysis and methodology, the task of describing acne pathophysiology remains challenging. Acne occurs in sites dominated by Cutibacterium acnes (formerly Propionibacterium acnes) and Malassezia species, both of which can function either as commensal or pathogen.

OBJECTIVES

This article aims to review the current state of the art of the microbiome and acne.

METHODS

The literature regarding the microbiome and acne was reviewed.

RESULTS

It remains unclear whether there is a quantitative difference in microbial community distribution, making it challenging to understand any community shift from commensal to pathogenic nature. It is plausible that acne involves (i) change in the distribution of species/strains, (ii) stable distribution with pathogenic alteration in response to internal (intermicrobe) or external stimuli (host physiology or environmental) or (iii) a combination of these factors.

CONCLUSIONS

Understanding physiological changes in bacterial species and strains will be required to define their specific roles, and identify any potential intervention points, in acne pathogenesis and treatment. It will also be necessary to determine whether any fungal species are involved, and establish whether they play a significant role. Further investigation using robust, modern analytic tools in longitudinal studies with a large number of participants, may make it possible to determine whether the microbiota plays a causal role, is primarily involved in exacerbation, or is merely a bystander. It is likely that the final outcome will show that acne is the result of complex microbe-microbe and community-host interplay.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Skin Research Institute Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore.Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.Skin Research Institute Singapore, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, Singapore, Singapore. Department of Drug Discovery, College of Pharmacy, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, U.S.A.Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31342510

Citation

Ramasamy, S, et al. "The Role of the Skin Microbiota in Acne Pathophysiology." The British Journal of Dermatology, vol. 181, no. 4, 2019, pp. 691-699.
Ramasamy S, Barnard E, Dawson TL, et al. The role of the skin microbiota in acne pathophysiology. Br J Dermatol. 2019;181(4):691-699.
Ramasamy, S., Barnard, E., Dawson, T. L., & Li, H. (2019). The role of the skin microbiota in acne pathophysiology. The British Journal of Dermatology, 181(4), 691-699. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.18230
Ramasamy S, et al. The Role of the Skin Microbiota in Acne Pathophysiology. Br J Dermatol. 2019;181(4):691-699. PubMed PMID: 31342510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of the skin microbiota in acne pathophysiology. AU - Ramasamy,S, AU - Barnard,E, AU - Dawson,T L,Jr AU - Li,H, Y1 - 2019/07/24/ PY - 2019/03/14/accepted PY - 2019/7/26/pubmed PY - 2020/12/22/medline PY - 2019/7/26/entrez SP - 691 EP - 699 JF - The British journal of dermatology JO - Br J Dermatol VL - 181 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The role of skin microbiota in acne remains to be fully elucidated. Initial culture-based investigations were hampered by growth rate and selective media bias. Even with less biased genomic methods, sampling, lysis and methodology, the task of describing acne pathophysiology remains challenging. Acne occurs in sites dominated by Cutibacterium acnes (formerly Propionibacterium acnes) and Malassezia species, both of which can function either as commensal or pathogen. OBJECTIVES: This article aims to review the current state of the art of the microbiome and acne. METHODS: The literature regarding the microbiome and acne was reviewed. RESULTS: It remains unclear whether there is a quantitative difference in microbial community distribution, making it challenging to understand any community shift from commensal to pathogenic nature. It is plausible that acne involves (i) change in the distribution of species/strains, (ii) stable distribution with pathogenic alteration in response to internal (intermicrobe) or external stimuli (host physiology or environmental) or (iii) a combination of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: Understanding physiological changes in bacterial species and strains will be required to define their specific roles, and identify any potential intervention points, in acne pathogenesis and treatment. It will also be necessary to determine whether any fungal species are involved, and establish whether they play a significant role. Further investigation using robust, modern analytic tools in longitudinal studies with a large number of participants, may make it possible to determine whether the microbiota plays a causal role, is primarily involved in exacerbation, or is merely a bystander. It is likely that the final outcome will show that acne is the result of complex microbe-microbe and community-host interplay. SN - 1365-2133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31342510/The_role_of_the_skin_microbiota_in_acne_pathophysiology_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjd.18230 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -