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Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neurocognitive development in children at two years of age.
Environ Int. 2019 10; 131:105023.EI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Phthalates are a family of endocrine disruptors with short elimination half-lives in the human body. To date, few epidemiological studies have examined repeated measures of maternal urinary phthalates and the combined effects of prenatal exposure to multiple phthalates on children's neurocognitive development.

OBJECTIVES

We aimed to investigate the association between children's neurocognitive development at 2 years of age and prenatal phthalate exposure, as assessed by repeated measurements during pregnancy, and to further examine the effects of co-exposure to multiple phthalates using cumulative risk assessment.

METHOD

Within a prenatal cohort in Wuhan, China, we measured five high-molecular-weight (HMW) phthalates and three low-molecular-weight (LMW) phthalate metabolites' concentrations in three urine samples collected in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester of pregnancy from each mother. We assessed neurocognitive development by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (BSID) at 2 years of age (n = 476) to obtain the children's mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor development index (PDI).

RESULTS

Higher exposure levels to LMW phthalates compared to HMW phthalates were observed in our population. Ln-transformed averaged concentration of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), a metabolite of the LMW phthalate di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) during pregnancy, was associated with decreased PDI scores in all children (β = -1.90, 95% CI: -3.43, -0.37). Similarly, the averaged sum concentration of ∑dibutyl phthalate (∑DBP) was associated with decreased PDI scores in all children (β = -1.89, 95% CI: -3.63, -0.15). A negative trend of association between exposure to HMW phthalates and PDI scores was observed in girls, while a positive association was found in boys. In cumulative risk assessment analyses, we consistently observed that the hazard quotient of DnBP (the parent compound of MnBP) was inversely associated with PDI scores in all children, whereas the hazard quotient of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), an HMW phthalate, was positively associated with PDI scores in boys only.

CONCLUSIONS

This study is the first to use repeated measurement of maternal urinary phthalates in all three trimesters to assess prenatal exposure in relation to children's neurodevelopment. Our study suggested a negative association between prenatal exposure to MnBP and children's psychomotor development, and potentially sex-specific associations between HMW phthalates and neurocognitive development among boys and girls. These findings warrant further confirmation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Institute of Environmental Health, Wuhan Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Wuhan Children's Hospital (Wuhan Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital), Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.State Key Laboratory of Environmental and Biological Analysis, Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong, SAR, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: zwcai@hkbu.edu.hk.Key Laboratory of Environment and Health, Ministry of Education & Ministry of Environmental Protection, State Key Laboratory of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: xiawei@hust.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31351385

Citation

Qian, Xi, et al. "Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates and Neurocognitive Development in Children at Two Years of Age." Environment International, vol. 131, 2019, p. 105023.
Qian X, Li J, Xu S, et al. Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neurocognitive development in children at two years of age. Environ Int. 2019;131:105023.
Qian, X., Li, J., Xu, S., Wan, Y., Li, Y., Jiang, Y., Zhao, H., Zhou, Y., Liao, J., Liu, H., Sun, X., Liu, W., Peng, Y., Hu, C., Zhang, B., Lu, S., Cai, Z., & Xia, W. (2019). Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neurocognitive development in children at two years of age. Environment International, 131, 105023. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2019.105023
Qian X, et al. Prenatal Exposure to Phthalates and Neurocognitive Development in Children at Two Years of Age. Environ Int. 2019;131:105023. PubMed PMID: 31351385.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal exposure to phthalates and neurocognitive development in children at two years of age. AU - Qian,Xi, AU - Li,Jiufeng, AU - Xu,Shunqing, AU - Wan,Yanjian, AU - Li,Yuanyuan, AU - Jiang,Yangqian, AU - Zhao,Hongzhi, AU - Zhou,Yanqiu, AU - Liao,Jiaqiang, AU - Liu,Hongxiu, AU - Sun,Xiaojie, AU - Liu,Wenyu, AU - Peng,Yang, AU - Hu,Chen, AU - Zhang,Bin, AU - Lu,Shi, AU - Cai,Zongwei, AU - Xia,Wei, Y1 - 2019/07/24/ PY - 2019/01/26/received PY - 2019/07/13/revised PY - 2019/07/15/accepted PY - 2019/7/28/pubmed PY - 2020/2/19/medline PY - 2019/7/28/entrez KW - Child neurodevelopment KW - Cumulative risk assessment KW - Phthalate metabolites KW - Prenatal exposure KW - Trimester-specific SP - 105023 EP - 105023 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 131 N2 - BACKGROUND: Phthalates are a family of endocrine disruptors with short elimination half-lives in the human body. To date, few epidemiological studies have examined repeated measures of maternal urinary phthalates and the combined effects of prenatal exposure to multiple phthalates on children's neurocognitive development. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the association between children's neurocognitive development at 2 years of age and prenatal phthalate exposure, as assessed by repeated measurements during pregnancy, and to further examine the effects of co-exposure to multiple phthalates using cumulative risk assessment. METHOD: Within a prenatal cohort in Wuhan, China, we measured five high-molecular-weight (HMW) phthalates and three low-molecular-weight (LMW) phthalate metabolites' concentrations in three urine samples collected in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester of pregnancy from each mother. We assessed neurocognitive development by Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (BSID) at 2 years of age (n = 476) to obtain the children's mental development index (MDI) and psychomotor development index (PDI). RESULTS: Higher exposure levels to LMW phthalates compared to HMW phthalates were observed in our population. Ln-transformed averaged concentration of mono-n-butyl phthalate (MnBP), a metabolite of the LMW phthalate di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) during pregnancy, was associated with decreased PDI scores in all children (β = -1.90, 95% CI: -3.43, -0.37). Similarly, the averaged sum concentration of ∑dibutyl phthalate (∑DBP) was associated with decreased PDI scores in all children (β = -1.89, 95% CI: -3.63, -0.15). A negative trend of association between exposure to HMW phthalates and PDI scores was observed in girls, while a positive association was found in boys. In cumulative risk assessment analyses, we consistently observed that the hazard quotient of DnBP (the parent compound of MnBP) was inversely associated with PDI scores in all children, whereas the hazard quotient of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), an HMW phthalate, was positively associated with PDI scores in boys only. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to use repeated measurement of maternal urinary phthalates in all three trimesters to assess prenatal exposure in relation to children's neurodevelopment. Our study suggested a negative association between prenatal exposure to MnBP and children's psychomotor development, and potentially sex-specific associations between HMW phthalates and neurocognitive development among boys and girls. These findings warrant further confirmation. SN - 1873-6750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31351385/Prenatal_exposure_to_phthalates_and_neurocognitive_development_in_children_at_two_years_of_age_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(19)30294-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -