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Higher striatal D2-receptor availability in aerobically fit older adults but non-selective intervention effects after aerobic versus resistance training.
Neuroimage. 2019 11 15; 202:116044.N

Abstract

There is much evidence that dopamine is vital for cognitive functioning in aging. Here we tested the hypothesis that aerobic exercise and fitness influence dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum, and in turn performance on offline working-memory updating tasks. Dopaminergic neurotransmission was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and the non-displacable binding potential (BPND) of [11C]raclopride, i.e. dopamine (DA) D2-receptor (D2R) availability. Fifty-four sedentary older adults underwent a six-months exercise intervention, performing either aerobic exercise or stretching, toning, and resistance active control training. At baseline, higher aerobic fitness levels (VO2peak) were associated with higher BPND in the striatum, providing evidence of a link between an objective measure of aerobic fitness and D2R in older adults. BPND decreased substantially over the intervention in both groups but the intervention effects were non-selective with respect to exercise group. The decrease was several times larger than any previously estimated annual decline in D2R, potentially due to increased endogenous DA. Working-memory was unrelated to D2R both at baseline and following the intervention. To conclude, we provide partial evidence for a link between physical exercise and DA. Utilizing a PET protocol able to disentangle both D2R and DA levels could shed further light on whether, and how, aerobic exercise impacts the dopaminergic system in older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: lars.jonasson@umu.se.Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Physiology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: lars.nyberg@umu.se.Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: jan.axelsson@umu.se.Departments of Psychology and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA; Beckman Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign, IL, USA. Electronic address: a.kramer@northeastern.edu.Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: katrine.riklund@umu.se.Umeå Center for Functional Brain Imaging, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Center for Demographic and Aging Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Electronic address: cj@drcmr.dk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31352122

Citation

Jonasson, Lars S., et al. "Higher Striatal D2-receptor Availability in Aerobically Fit Older Adults but Non-selective Intervention Effects After Aerobic Versus Resistance Training." NeuroImage, vol. 202, 2019, p. 116044.
Jonasson LS, Nyberg L, Axelsson J, et al. Higher striatal D2-receptor availability in aerobically fit older adults but non-selective intervention effects after aerobic versus resistance training. Neuroimage. 2019;202:116044.
Jonasson, L. S., Nyberg, L., Axelsson, J., Kramer, A. F., Riklund, K., & Boraxbekk, C. J. (2019). Higher striatal D2-receptor availability in aerobically fit older adults but non-selective intervention effects after aerobic versus resistance training. NeuroImage, 202, 116044. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116044
Jonasson LS, et al. Higher Striatal D2-receptor Availability in Aerobically Fit Older Adults but Non-selective Intervention Effects After Aerobic Versus Resistance Training. Neuroimage. 2019 11 15;202:116044. PubMed PMID: 31352122.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher striatal D2-receptor availability in aerobically fit older adults but non-selective intervention effects after aerobic versus resistance training. AU - Jonasson,Lars S, AU - Nyberg,Lars, AU - Axelsson,Jan, AU - Kramer,Arthur F, AU - Riklund,Katrine, AU - Boraxbekk,Carl-Johan, Y1 - 2019/07/26/ PY - 2019/02/14/received PY - 2019/07/15/revised PY - 2019/07/21/accepted PY - 2019/7/29/pubmed PY - 2020/9/15/medline PY - 2019/7/29/entrez KW - Aerobic exercise KW - D2 KW - Dopamine KW - Fitness KW - Raclopride KW - Working memory SP - 116044 EP - 116044 JF - NeuroImage JO - Neuroimage VL - 202 N2 - There is much evidence that dopamine is vital for cognitive functioning in aging. Here we tested the hypothesis that aerobic exercise and fitness influence dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum, and in turn performance on offline working-memory updating tasks. Dopaminergic neurotransmission was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) and the non-displacable binding potential (BPND) of [11C]raclopride, i.e. dopamine (DA) D2-receptor (D2R) availability. Fifty-four sedentary older adults underwent a six-months exercise intervention, performing either aerobic exercise or stretching, toning, and resistance active control training. At baseline, higher aerobic fitness levels (VO2peak) were associated with higher BPND in the striatum, providing evidence of a link between an objective measure of aerobic fitness and D2R in older adults. BPND decreased substantially over the intervention in both groups but the intervention effects were non-selective with respect to exercise group. The decrease was several times larger than any previously estimated annual decline in D2R, potentially due to increased endogenous DA. Working-memory was unrelated to D2R both at baseline and following the intervention. To conclude, we provide partial evidence for a link between physical exercise and DA. Utilizing a PET protocol able to disentangle both D2R and DA levels could shed further light on whether, and how, aerobic exercise impacts the dopaminergic system in older adults. SN - 1095-9572 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31352122/Higher_striatal_D2_receptor_availability_in_aerobically_fit_older_adults_but_non_selective_intervention_effects_after_aerobic_versus_resistance_training_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1053-8119(19)30625-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -