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Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex.
J Sch Health. 2019 10; 89(10):800-808.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little research exists examining the impact of multiple minority identities, particularly sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and sex on health-risk behaviors like mental health, substance use, violence, and sexual risk among high school students in the United States. In this study, we use a nationally representative dataset to examine differences between non-Hispanic white heterosexuals (HSs) and non-Hispanic white sexual minority, black HS, black sexual minority, Hispanic HS, and Hispanic sexual minority students.

METHODS

Data from the 2015 wave of the Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System were used in this study. Chi-square and hierarchical logistic regression models examined differences between the groups on outcomes including: (1) mental health and suicide, (2) alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substances, (3) sexual risk and protective factors, and (4) school and physical and/or sexual violence.

RESULTS

Whereas sexual minority youth (SMY) generally demonstrate poorer health outcomes compared to HSs, SMY who are also racial/ethnic minorities often have even poorer health outcomes, particularly relating to substance use, sexual risk behaviors, physical/sexual violence, and suicide.

CONCLUSIONS

The need for culturally tailored education and school-based interventions that consider intersections between race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and biological sex are warranted to address health disparities related to mental health and suicide, substance use, sexual risk, and violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, 5030 Brunson Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146.University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD.University of Miami School of Nursing and Health Studies, Coral Gables, FL.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31353476

Citation

Gattamorta, Karina A., et al. "Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex." The Journal of School Health, vol. 89, no. 10, 2019, pp. 800-808.
Gattamorta KA, Salerno JP, Castro AJ. Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex. J Sch Health. 2019;89(10):800-808.
Gattamorta, K. A., Salerno, J. P., & Castro, A. J. (2019). Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex. The Journal of School Health, 89(10), 800-808. https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12817
Gattamorta KA, Salerno JP, Castro AJ. Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex. J Sch Health. 2019;89(10):800-808. PubMed PMID: 31353476.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intersectionality and Health Behaviors Among US High School Students: Examining Race/Ethnicity, Sexual Identity, and Sex. AU - Gattamorta,Karina A, AU - Salerno,John P, AU - Castro,Amanda J, Y1 - 2019/07/28/ PY - 2017/10/02/received PY - 2018/08/23/revised PY - 2018/10/16/accepted PY - 2019/7/30/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline PY - 2019/7/30/entrez KW - health risk-taking KW - mental health KW - race/ethnicity KW - risky sexual behaviors KW - sexual minorities KW - substance use KW - violence SP - 800 EP - 808 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 89 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little research exists examining the impact of multiple minority identities, particularly sexual orientation, race/ethnicity, and sex on health-risk behaviors like mental health, substance use, violence, and sexual risk among high school students in the United States. In this study, we use a nationally representative dataset to examine differences between non-Hispanic white heterosexuals (HSs) and non-Hispanic white sexual minority, black HS, black sexual minority, Hispanic HS, and Hispanic sexual minority students. METHODS: Data from the 2015 wave of the Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System were used in this study. Chi-square and hierarchical logistic regression models examined differences between the groups on outcomes including: (1) mental health and suicide, (2) alcohol, tobacco, and illicit substances, (3) sexual risk and protective factors, and (4) school and physical and/or sexual violence. RESULTS: Whereas sexual minority youth (SMY) generally demonstrate poorer health outcomes compared to HSs, SMY who are also racial/ethnic minorities often have even poorer health outcomes, particularly relating to substance use, sexual risk behaviors, physical/sexual violence, and suicide. CONCLUSIONS: The need for culturally tailored education and school-based interventions that consider intersections between race/ethnicity, sexual identity, and biological sex are warranted to address health disparities related to mental health and suicide, substance use, sexual risk, and violence. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31353476/Intersectionality_and_Health_Behaviors_Among_US_High_School_Students:_Examining_Race/Ethnicity_Sexual_Identity_and_Sex_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/josh.12817 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -