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Death related to epiglottitis.
Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2020 Mar; 16(1):177-179.FS

Abstract

Although death due to epiglottitis is well-reported in the medical literature, because of vaccines and antibiotics, deaths caused by epiglottitis are rare in the era of modern medicine. This report presents a case of epiglottitis-related death occurring in a middle-aged diabetic man. He initially presented to an emergency department with complaints of a sore throat and bilateral ear pain. Although a quick test for Strep pneumoniae was negative, the work-up was not extensive enough to exclude epiglottitis. He was discharged with a prescription for a decongestant and instructed to drink plenty of fluids. He subsequently collapsed in respiratory distress while waiting to fill his prescription at a pharmacy. He was admitted to the hospital and eventually diagnosed with anoxic brain injury, dying 4 days following his initial presentation. Autopsy disclosed gross and microscopic features of acute epiglottitis, which was considered the underlying cause of death. Awareness of epiglottitis and its risk factors is essential in identifying the proper diagnosis clinically. Characteristic findings at autopsy can confirm the diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, 300 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA.Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, 300 Portage St, Kalamazoo, MI, 49008, USA. joseph.prahlow@med.wmich.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31359308

Citation

Morton, Ernest, and Joseph A. Prahlow. "Death Related to Epiglottitis." Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology, vol. 16, no. 1, 2020, pp. 177-179.
Morton E, Prahlow JA. Death related to epiglottitis. Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2020;16(1):177-179.
Morton, E., & Prahlow, J. A. (2020). Death related to epiglottitis. Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology, 16(1), 177-179. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12024-019-00142-1
Morton E, Prahlow JA. Death Related to Epiglottitis. Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2020;16(1):177-179. PubMed PMID: 31359308.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Death related to epiglottitis. AU - Morton,Ernest, AU - Prahlow,Joseph A, Y1 - 2019/07/29/ PY - 2019/07/03/accepted PY - 2019/7/31/pubmed PY - 2019/7/31/medline PY - 2019/7/31/entrez KW - Adult KW - Death KW - Epiglottitis KW - Pathology SP - 177 EP - 179 JF - Forensic science, medicine, and pathology JO - Forensic Sci Med Pathol VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - Although death due to epiglottitis is well-reported in the medical literature, because of vaccines and antibiotics, deaths caused by epiglottitis are rare in the era of modern medicine. This report presents a case of epiglottitis-related death occurring in a middle-aged diabetic man. He initially presented to an emergency department with complaints of a sore throat and bilateral ear pain. Although a quick test for Strep pneumoniae was negative, the work-up was not extensive enough to exclude epiglottitis. He was discharged with a prescription for a decongestant and instructed to drink plenty of fluids. He subsequently collapsed in respiratory distress while waiting to fill his prescription at a pharmacy. He was admitted to the hospital and eventually diagnosed with anoxic brain injury, dying 4 days following his initial presentation. Autopsy disclosed gross and microscopic features of acute epiglottitis, which was considered the underlying cause of death. Awareness of epiglottitis and its risk factors is essential in identifying the proper diagnosis clinically. Characteristic findings at autopsy can confirm the diagnosis. SN - 1556-2891 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31359308/Death_related_to_epiglottitis L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12024-019-00142-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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