Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Orthorexia nervosa, eating patterns and personality traits: a cross-cultural comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish university students.
BMC Psychiatry. 2019 07 30; 19(1):235.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The amount of research about orthorexic attitudes and behaviours has increased in the last five years, but is still mainly based on descriptive and anecdotal data, yielding a variety of prevalence data and inconsistent results. The interplay between socio-cultural context and orthorexia has been poorly investigated and is still far from being understood.

METHOD

Multicentre, cross-sectional study involving Italian (N = 216), Polish (N = 206) and Spanish (N = 242) university students, assessed through a protocol including informed consent, socio-demographic and anamnestic data sheet and self-administered questionnaires (ORTO-15, Eating Attitudes Test- 26 [EAT-26], Temperament and Character Inventory [TCI]).

RESULTS

Higher prevalence of orthorexia (as described by the ORTO-15 cutoff) was found in Poland. Female gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), current Eating Disorder, dieting, EAT-26 score ≥ 20 and low/medium Persistence were associated with orthorexia in the whole sample. The cross-cultural comparison showed several differences among the three subgroups of students.

CONCLUSIONS

The associations found between orthorexic attitudes, self-reported current eating disorder, BMI and adherence to a dieting need to be supported by further research. The differences among students from the three countries seem to suggest a possible rolve for cultural elements in the construct of orthorexia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Psychiatry Ward, Maggiore della Carità University Hospital, Novara, Italy. Department of Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.Psychiatry Ward, Maggiore della Carità University Hospital, Novara, Italy. Department of Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.Department of Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Via DeSantis, 86100, Campobasso, Italy.Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Via DeSantis, 86100, Campobasso, Italy.Department of Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.Departamento de Personalidad, Evaluación y Tratamientos Psicológicos. Facultad de Psicología, Universitat de València. Av. Blasco Ibáñez, 21. 46010, Valencia, Spain.Departamento de Personalidad, Evaluación y Tratamientos Psicológicos. Facultad de Psicología, Universitat de València. Av. Blasco Ibáñez, 21. 46010, Valencia, Spain. CIBER Fisiopatología Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.Katowice Faculty of Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Katowice, Poland.Institute of Psychology, University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland.Psychiatry Ward, Maggiore della Carità University Hospital, Novara, Italy. patrizia.zeppegno@med.uniupo.it. Department of Translational Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy. patrizia.zeppegno@med.uniupo.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31362720

Citation

Gramaglia, Carla, et al. "Orthorexia Nervosa, Eating Patterns and Personality Traits: a Cross-cultural Comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish University Students." BMC Psychiatry, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019, p. 235.
Gramaglia C, Gambaro E, Delicato C, et al. Orthorexia nervosa, eating patterns and personality traits: a cross-cultural comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish university students. BMC Psychiatry. 2019;19(1):235.
Gramaglia, C., Gambaro, E., Delicato, C., Marchetti, M., Sarchiapone, M., Ferrante, D., Roncero, M., Perpiñá, C., Brytek-Matera, A., Wojtyna, E., & Zeppegno, P. (2019). Orthorexia nervosa, eating patterns and personality traits: a cross-cultural comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish university students. BMC Psychiatry, 19(1), 235. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-019-2208-2
Gramaglia C, et al. Orthorexia Nervosa, Eating Patterns and Personality Traits: a Cross-cultural Comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish University Students. BMC Psychiatry. 2019 07 30;19(1):235. PubMed PMID: 31362720.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Orthorexia nervosa, eating patterns and personality traits: a cross-cultural comparison of Italian, Polish and Spanish university students. AU - Gramaglia,Carla, AU - Gambaro,Eleonora, AU - Delicato,Claudia, AU - Marchetti,Marco, AU - Sarchiapone,Marco, AU - Ferrante,Daniela, AU - Roncero,María, AU - Perpiñá,Conxa, AU - Brytek-Matera,Anna, AU - Wojtyna,Ewa, AU - Zeppegno,Patrizia, Y1 - 2019/07/30/ PY - 2019/04/15/received PY - 2019/07/10/accepted PY - 2019/8/1/entrez PY - 2019/8/1/pubmed PY - 2020/4/25/medline KW - Cross-cultural comparison KW - Eating patterns KW - Orthorexia nervosa KW - Personality traits SP - 235 EP - 235 JF - BMC psychiatry JO - BMC Psychiatry VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The amount of research about orthorexic attitudes and behaviours has increased in the last five years, but is still mainly based on descriptive and anecdotal data, yielding a variety of prevalence data and inconsistent results. The interplay between socio-cultural context and orthorexia has been poorly investigated and is still far from being understood. METHOD: Multicentre, cross-sectional study involving Italian (N = 216), Polish (N = 206) and Spanish (N = 242) university students, assessed through a protocol including informed consent, socio-demographic and anamnestic data sheet and self-administered questionnaires (ORTO-15, Eating Attitudes Test- 26 [EAT-26], Temperament and Character Inventory [TCI]). RESULTS: Higher prevalence of orthorexia (as described by the ORTO-15 cutoff) was found in Poland. Female gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), current Eating Disorder, dieting, EAT-26 score ≥ 20 and low/medium Persistence were associated with orthorexia in the whole sample. The cross-cultural comparison showed several differences among the three subgroups of students. CONCLUSIONS: The associations found between orthorexic attitudes, self-reported current eating disorder, BMI and adherence to a dieting need to be supported by further research. The differences among students from the three countries seem to suggest a possible rolve for cultural elements in the construct of orthorexia. SN - 1471-244X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31362720/Orthorexia_nervosa_eating_patterns_and_personality_traits:_a_cross_cultural_comparison_of_Italian_Polish_and_Spanish_university_students_ L2 - https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12888-019-2208-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -