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Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study.
Nutrients. 2019 Aug 02; 11(8)N

Abstract

In the transition from high school to university, vegetable consumption tends to deteriorate, potentially influencing immediate and longer-term health outcomes. Nudges, manipulation of the environment to influence choice, have emerged as important to behavior change goals. This quasi-experimental pilot study examined the impact of a contextually feasible evidence-informed nudge intervention on food purchasing behavior of older adolescents (1st year students) in a university residence cafeteria in British Columbia, Canada. A co-design process with students and staff identified a student relevant and operationally feasible nudge intervention; a placement nudge, fresh vegetables at the hot food table, combined with a sensory and cognitive nudge, signage encouraging vegetable purchase). Using a 12-week single-case A-B-A-B design, observations of the proportion of vegetables purchased were used to assess intervention efficacy. Data analysis included visual trend inspection, central tendency measures, data overlap, variability and latency. Visual trend inspection showed a positive trend when nudges were in place, which was more apparent with female purchases and during the first intervention (B) phase. However, further analysis showed lack of baseline stability, high variability across phases and overlapping data, limiting efficacy conclusions. Menu choices, staff encouragement, term timing and student finances are other potential influences. Further 'real world' nudge research is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Chronic Disease Prevention Research and Knowledge Exchange Unit, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada.Chronic Disease Prevention Research and Knowledge Exchange Unit, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada.Chronic Disease Prevention Research and Knowledge Exchange Unit, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada. Behavioural Medicine Lab, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada.Chronic Disease Prevention Research and Knowledge Exchange Unit, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada.Chronic Disease Prevention Research and Knowledge Exchange Unit, School of Exercise Science, Physical and Health Education, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2P1, Canada. pjnaylor@uvic.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31382395

Citation

Mistura, Matheus, et al. "Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables By First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: a Pilot Study." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 8, 2019.
Mistura M, Fetterly N, Rhodes RE, et al. Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study. Nutrients. 2019;11(8).
Mistura, M., Fetterly, N., Rhodes, R. E., Tomlin, D., & Naylor, P. J. (2019). Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study. Nutrients, 11(8). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11081786
Mistura M, et al. Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables By First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: a Pilot Study. Nutrients. 2019 Aug 2;11(8) PubMed PMID: 31382395.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Examining the Efficacy of a 'Feasible' Nudge Intervention to Increase the Purchase of Vegetables by First Year University Students (17-19 Years of Age) in British Columbia: A Pilot Study. AU - Mistura,Matheus, AU - Fetterly,Nicole, AU - Rhodes,Ryan E, AU - Tomlin,Dona, AU - Naylor,Patti-Jean, Y1 - 2019/08/02/ PY - 2019/06/29/received PY - 2019/07/30/revised PY - 2019/08/01/accepted PY - 2019/8/7/entrez PY - 2019/8/7/pubmed PY - 2020/1/21/medline KW - adolescents KW - cafeteria KW - choice architecture KW - food KW - nudge KW - students KW - university KW - vegetable JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 8 N2 - In the transition from high school to university, vegetable consumption tends to deteriorate, potentially influencing immediate and longer-term health outcomes. Nudges, manipulation of the environment to influence choice, have emerged as important to behavior change goals. This quasi-experimental pilot study examined the impact of a contextually feasible evidence-informed nudge intervention on food purchasing behavior of older adolescents (1st year students) in a university residence cafeteria in British Columbia, Canada. A co-design process with students and staff identified a student relevant and operationally feasible nudge intervention; a placement nudge, fresh vegetables at the hot food table, combined with a sensory and cognitive nudge, signage encouraging vegetable purchase). Using a 12-week single-case A-B-A-B design, observations of the proportion of vegetables purchased were used to assess intervention efficacy. Data analysis included visual trend inspection, central tendency measures, data overlap, variability and latency. Visual trend inspection showed a positive trend when nudges were in place, which was more apparent with female purchases and during the first intervention (B) phase. However, further analysis showed lack of baseline stability, high variability across phases and overlapping data, limiting efficacy conclusions. Menu choices, staff encouragement, term timing and student finances are other potential influences. Further 'real world' nudge research is needed. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31382395/Examining_the_Efficacy_of_a_'Feasible'_Nudge_Intervention_to_Increase_the_Purchase_of_Vegetables_by_First_Year_University_Students_(17-19_Years_of_Age)_in_British_Columbia:_A_Pilot_Study L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11081786 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -